Covenant Words
Covenant Words

Episode · 7 years ago

A Marriage of Biblical Proportions

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Rev. Christopher Chelpka

A mascul of the sons of Cora, a love song. My heart overflows with a pleasing theme. I address my verses to the king. My tongue is like the pen of a ready scribe. You are the most handsome of the sons of men. Grace is poured upon your lips. Therefore, God has blessed you forever. Gird your sword on your thigh, O Mighty one, in your splendor and majesty, in Your Majesty, ride out victoriously for the cause of truth and meekness and righteousness. Let your right hand teach you awesome deeds. Your Arrows are sharp in the heart of the king's enemies, the People's fall under you. Your throne, O God, is forever and ever. The scepter of your kingdom is a scepter of uprightness. You have loved righteousness and hated wickedness. Therefore, God, your God, has anointed you with the oil of gladness. Beyond your companions, your robes are all fragrant with Murr and aloes and Cassia from ivory. Palace's stringed instruments make you glad. Daughters of kings are among your ladies of honor. At your right hand stands the Queen in Gold of Oh fear here, oh daughter, and consider and incline your ear. Forget your people and your father's house, and the king will desire your beauty, since he is your Lord. Bow To him. The people of tire will seek your favor with gifts. The richest of the people. All glorious is the princess in her chamber, with robes interwoven with gold and many colored robes. She has led to the king, with her virgin companions following behind her. With joy and gladness they are led along as they enter the Palace of the king. In place of your father's shall be your sons. You will make them princes in all the earth. I will cause your name to be remembered in all generations there, for nations will praise you forever and ever. To the choir master, may God bless his word. Please be seated. When we think about the great marriage texts of the Bible, the great love texts, the things that we go to in lessons on marriage or in times of premarital counseling or the these kinds of things, one of the places that we often go is not here. It's...

Ephesians five right. We read there of the Great Love that Christ had and has for the church. I'll read to you from Ephesians five hundred and twenty five. Husband's love your wives, as Christ loved the Church and gave himself up for her, that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, so that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. Well, these instructions to husband's based on the great love of Christ, is put in this metaphor of marriage. We are told that the church is the bride of Christ. But there is another important passage in the Bible that also speaks of this marriage between the son of God and his church, and that's this text, Psalm forty five. It's specifically tells us it's a love song. Again, when we think of the love songs of the Bible, I don't understand why this one is always forgotten, because it is a beautiful love song. On this picture of the bride and the groom, soul, handsome, so beautiful. It's a very evocative and filled with all kinds of praise in need the one writing the song. We get a something of the heart of the narrator explicitly. In Verse One, he says my heart overflows with a pleasing theme. I address my verses to the king. My tongue is like the pen of a ready scribe. He's so happy, he's so happy about this king in particular and this marriage that's described here, that he finds his heart overflowing with goodness, with a pleasing theme, he can't help but write. His tongue is ready, he's ready to go, and indeed he he goes, he jumps right in verse two, you are the most handsome of the sons of men. This these great, great descriptions, but as we read on we find out that this is a no ordinary wedding. It's not even an ordinary royal wedding, because this king is no ordinary king, this bride is no ordinary bride. I'm perhaps you caught this, or maybe we're even a little surprised by this as I was reading it earlier. We have this description of a man. You are the most handsome of the sons of men. Grace is poured out on your lips. Talks about a sword, him riding out in Majesty, conquering his enemies, and then, all of a sudden, verse six, Your Throne, Oh God, is forever and ever your he addresses this one to whom he has been speaking, this great man among the sons of men,...

...as God. The scepter of your kingdom is a scepter of uprightness. You have loved wickedness or right you have loved righteousness and hated wickedness. Therefore, God, your God, has anointed you, beyond, anointed you with the oil of gladness, beyond your companions. Well now you, perhaps you would be additionally confused. We have this person who seems to be described as God, and then yet we are he. It talks about him as having a God. He says, therefore, God, your God, has anointed you. We have what you see here, I hope you're beginning to see, is one important passage describing the trinity. Is a relation between father and son, both equal in power and glory and both deserving of that title that is only reserve for the one true God. Any doubt about this should be put to rest by if Hebrews verse one, or sorry, Hebrews one versus eight through nine, I'll read them read them to you. Hebrews one eight through nine quotes this psalm and speaking of Jesus, who is come, says, but of the son that is of Jesus, he says your throne o God is forever and ever, the scepter of uprightness, is the scepter of your kingdom. And he goes on and he he quotes that the other portions of that song. So the spirit of God himself assigns this particular role, this great handsome prince, this king. He assigns the rule to Jesus. So, as I say, Psalm forty five is no ordinary love song between a man and a woman. It's a love song that describes the marriage of Christ and the church. And this is really remarkable because, in the way that Ephesians five in some ways talks about the ongoing relationship and, of course, how it began, Hebrew or sorry, Psalm Forty five describes that day in human terms, in analogical terms, in terms of metaphor and analogy, but that is what's being described. God is helping us to have a theological and a very personal understanding of what your wedding day was like with King Jesus. It's a love song that reminds all Christians of their wedding day with the Lord and as such, it's a useful thing to consider and remember. Husbands and wives do this all the time, and hopefully more than just once a year, to think about their wedding, their marriage, what that day was like, what kinds of commitments were made. As we consider that marriage between Jesus...

...and the church, we see UN that in some ways it's similar to our marriages here on earth, but in other ways it's also very different. So let's consider what psalm forty five has to say about the marriage between Christ and the church. First will consider the glory of this marriage and then the grace of the marriage. First it's glory if you imagine a wedding, even a common wedding, but extend that out for imagination safety, the most grand, most expensive, most elaboratively planned wedding. Even these kinds of weddings, the weddings of magazines, they still have their problems, don't they? Every wedding has its share of late rivals and stuck zippers forgotten flowers, not to mention more serious and sometimes very deep concerns, fears of the unknown, haunts of old sins. These things are present human marriages too, but in psalm forty five there's nothing of the sort, is there? There's no, I'm accidents and bad planning and little things falling apart and one of the groomsmen not showing up. Nor is their nervousness among any member of the family. Is this really supposed to work out? Is this the right move? There's no hesitancy, there's nothing like that. The marriage between Christ and his church, as described here in Psalm forty five, is nothing but glorious. Nothing but Glorious and nothing but perfect, and you see it particularly in the descriptions of the bride and the groom. He is the handsomest among men. She is singularly desired among this see of princesses that are standing in his court. He he has robes that smell expensive. Her robes are interwoven with gold. He is described as a noble king who quote, who are sorry, who wields his sword for quote, the cause of truth and meekness and justice. He sounds like a real life superhero, and indeed he is, because we read that this is no pretend person, this Jesus who comes for the cause of truth and meekness and justice. The Psalm says that God is with him, anointing him with the oil of gladness. He is established and His throne is established forever endeavor. She is called glorious, and the train of her companions,...

...which are many, are led by joy and gladness around them, surrounding them, is just more beauty. It's in their clothes, it's in the smells of the air, it's in her looks, it's in the joy and the gladness, it's in the company, it's in the Ivory Palaces that are described. It's in the music from stringed instruments swirling all around them. This is how the spirit of God describes the Church's wedding with the Lord Jesus Christ. This is almost dreamlike, isn't it? It's far beyond any magazine picture or or a bridle show that you've ever seen or experienced. This wedding is perfect. It's full of glory and nobility and power. Kings and Queens are flocking from all over the world to come and see this a beloved bride. This is the glory of our marriage with the Lord Jesus well, the second thing to notice about the marriage is that the glory of the bride is guaranteed by the grace of the groom. This is not a marriage of equals and in many ways this is where the big differences between our marriages that go on in this world and the marriage that occurs between us and our Savior, this is where are many of the differences are to be found. This is not a marriage of equals. This is not one very handsome young man and one very beautiful young lady coming together because there's such a lovely couple. She is who she is because he is who he is. She is beautiful because he's made her that way. She's beautiful because he is God. Very early on in the Psalm we read that he's the most handsome of the sons of men. Grace is poured upon your lips. Therefore, God has blessed you forever. The very first way that his handsomeness is described is in terms of grace. That's where the great beauty and the center, the central aspects of his beauty comes from. It's from the great grace of the king and, as I read earlier, Ephesians five tells us about that grace. What it is that grace looks like in means, he loved her. He gave himself up for her that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the wash of the words, so that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without...

...spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. You see what the Bible says. You are glorious. The Church of Christ is glorious because she has been made this way through the grace of her loving groom and because it's him, not just some guy, but it's because it's the god of the universe who does these things by his singularly powerful what love, this glory that's described here, is a glory that's not going away. It might be hidden in this in this age, but it's definitely present and promised, and it's described here in Psalm forty five. We know from the Scriptures, then, the church is is a body of people that has been possessed, cleansed, sought after. We read of the great cost of this grace, the great ass of the great cost of his love. He doesn't just feel really good about her, he lays down his life for her, he dies for her. The cleansing that's described for her thought that she would be holy and perfect in every way. Is a cleansing that's done by his very shed blood, and we remember that he did this not for someone who was lovely, but's for someone who is ugly in her sin. He loved her while she was still running after other men. This is some of what is described in Jose as. We've been reading this as God's people go and adulterate themselves, as prostitute themselves to other gods. It's in that that God extends His mercy and his love. Jesus doesn't go and find the best among us, he finds those that are described in scriptures as the worst among sinners, those who weren't of many means and nobility, and so forth. The glory she possesses did not come by cleaning up her act, but by the cleansing, purifying work of God bought for her when he died for her on the cross. And so, when we read these descriptions of her verse thirteen, all glorious as the princess in her chamber, with robes interwoven with gold, in many colored low robes, she has led to the Queen or to the king, with her virgin companions following behind her with joy and gladness. They're let along as they enter the Palace of the king. These...

...commands that are given to her as well in verse ten. Here, oh daughter, and consider and incline your ear, forget your people and your father's house, and the king will desire your beauty. There is a call here to leave something behind, to leave behind the sin, to leave behind the filthy rags that once covered us, to leave behind the idolatry and to walk in the grace and glory of Jesus Christ, to be long to belong to him. It's through this gracious gift that she, who once wore the rags of sin and death, is now clothed by love in a glorious wedding dress of life. This simple fact, the grace of God and the glory of God and his uniting himself to us, should be a constant reminder of who we are and how we belong to Jesus. Psalm forty five, then, and should be a great encouragement and, in the scripture, to you, one of the great testimonies of God's love for you. It's a love song in many different ways. It's a love song to the king. It's a way that we, with the scribe and with the bride, can lift up our hearts and praise this one who is who acts in this, in this way, who saved US and married us. But it's also his love song to us, because this scribe was not just a man, but is the spirit of God, writing this down to the praise of himself, but also for our benefit. This is a love song that has been inscribed to you, a love poem for you by your King and your husband, and all this I find it very helpful, and the same way that we look at our wedding pictures on the walls, or we might consider anniversaries of friends and families, or perhaps our own psalm forty five gives us an occasion to remember these similar things when it comes to Jesus, and this is very helpful to us, for in a real sense, in a very real sense, our husband is a way, he's at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty, as we confess in the creeds, and is is a taught in scripture. We have his spirit, but we feel away from him and we long to be with him and we await for his bodily return. That is difficult. The descriptures describe it as such and call us to wait and to trust in him on in by faith. And while we wait, as we...

...all know, our lives often struggle. Our promises of love and obedience to our husband are sometimes proved to be quite empty, and sometimes we even allow Satan himself to come between us and our beloved, to tempt us to doubt his love, to tempt us to grant doubt the grace and the glory that are here. But God has golven a psalm forty five to put these doubts to rest, to say that, although you don't always see this glory now, this is who you are, this is who I've made you to be. God has given us a love letter to remind us of his supreme love. In Christ you have a husband who is everlasting, who is full of forgiveness and grace, and his given you and blessed you with those things and with all the attendant glory from the day of your marriage, which happened before the foundations of the world began. And it's a marriage that will last forever and ever because it's established on the grace and glory and promises of God. Let us pray.

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