Covenant Words
Covenant Words

Episode · 7 years ago

God is King of All People

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Rev. Christopher Chelpka

If you're able to remain standing, please do and let's give our attention now to genesis chapter ten. Genesis ten, please give your attention to God's word. These are the generations of the sons of Noah, Shem, Ham and Japheth. Sons were born to them after the flood. The sons of Jafef, Gomer, Magog, Madai, Javan, Tubal, Meshek and Tyrus, the sons of Gomer Ashkenaz Ryfath and Torgamah, the sons of Javan, Elishah, tarshish, kittum and Dodanim, Dodonian. From these the coast land people spread in their lands, each with their own language, by their clans in their nations. The sons of Ham, Kush, Egypt, put and Canaan, the sons of Kush, CIB, Havla, SOB to, Rama and Septica, the sons of Rama Shiba Didon. Kush fathered Nimrod. He was the first on earth to be a mighty man. He was a mighty hunter before Jehovah. Therefore, it is said like Nimrod, a mighty hunter before Jehovah. The beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Eric, a cod and Calneh in the land of Shinar. From that land he went into Assyria and built Nineveh, Rahabbath are, Kala and rest in between Nineveh and Kalah, that is, the great city Egypt. Fathered Ludin on AMM LEHEBEM and Naphtaheim Pathraciem Castleheim, from whom the Philistines came, and Kafterem Canaan fathered sid and his firstborn and Seth and the Jebusites, the Amorites and the Gurghashites, the hivites, the archeits, the Synites, the Arvad Arvadites and the Zemorites and the have Hamathites. Afterward, the clans of the Canaanites dispersed in the territory of the Canaanites extended from Sidon in the direction of Garrar as far as Gauza, and in the direction of Sodom, Gomorrah, Oddma and Zeboem as far as lasha. These are the sons of ham by their clans, their languages, their lands and their nations. To Sham also the father of all the...

...children of Eber, the son of J fef children were born the sons of Shem Elam Ah Ahshur our, Parkashad, Lud and Aram, the sons of Aram, US whole gether and mash our. Parkashad fathered Shallah, and Shallah fathered. Eber to Eber, were born two sons. The name of the one was Pealeg, for in his days the earth was divided, and his brother's name was Joktan. Joktan fathered Almadad Shlipe or shall ef, Hazamaref and Jarah Ha, Jerah, Hadaram, Uzal Dik Lah, Obal Abimil Sheba, Ophir, Havlah and Jobab. All these were the sons of Jokton. The territory in which these they lived extended from Mesha, in the direction of Safar, to the hill country of the east. These are the sons of Shem by their clans, their languages, their lands and their nations. These are the clans of the sons of Noah, according to their genealogies, in their nations, and from these nations spread abroad on earth, abroad on the Earth after the flood. May God bless his word to us. Please be seated over these several chapters in genesis, to be beginning of the Bible. We've been considering in various ways the great power and sovereignty of our God, of the only God, the God of over the God who is over all the world, who made the world. When we think of God's sovereignty and his power, we are right too often think of creation, and we do, and the Bible points us this way. We think of the world that God has made as proof for his sovereignty over his power in it. But the one who considers God's power in creation has to think beyond just creation. I say this because often times many people stop at this point. They think of God having made the world, but they don't really think of God exercising his power in the world old. But listen to how the Bible expresses both truths and Psalm thirty three, verse six. By the Word of Jehovah, the...

...heavens were made and the end, by the breath of his mouth, all their host. We see that God doesn't just create a shell, in other words sort of a shell of a world, but he he feels it as well. He makes the heavens and he fills it with their host. He does this, of course, with the sea and the sky and also the land, the earth itself. We see God's sovereignty, not only in creating the world and beginning it, but continuing to exercise his power and his authority in every way. Among the animals and plants, scripture most often speaks of, though, I'm his sovereignty among men. The reason for this is because scripture is addressed to us, I'm, not to the plants and animals, but to us. God is speaking to us, and so he affirms and reaffirms over and over his righteous rule, I'm over us. So Psalm thirty three, after confessing this truth, I'm goes on to say, let all the Earth Fear Jehovah, let the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him. This is the takeaway, this is our application of these truths, when we recognize is the world that God has made his sovereignty and his power and every aspect of our lives, we are to fear Jehovah, we are to stand in all of him, for he spoke and it came to be, he commanded and it stood firm. Reading on just a little bit more in Psalm thirty three, we read how this these actions then begin to pertain, or do pertain, to the particular affairs of mankind. Jehovah brings the counsel of the nations to nothing. He frustrates the plans of the people's the counsel of the Lord stands forever, the plans of his heart to all generations. Genesis chapter ten speaks of all of these things and puts in concrete detail these truth spoken about in Psalm thirty three and many other portions of scripture. God doesn't just create an empty shell. His sovereignty is and not limited to a particular moment in time, but it extends to the filling of the world, extends to all those people and generation after generations, time progresses. God's sovereignty is over all people. Again, he brings the counsels of the nations to nothing, he frustrates the plans of the people. This will become even more concretely true in Genesis Chapter Eleven. There's a lot of things foreshadowed in genesis ten that are anticipating what will come in the Tower of Babel, this great plan of the people, where they will construct this great tower reaching up...

...to the heavens. This this expression of Hubrists, of pride, of a denial that God is not sovereign over them. And what does God do? He will frustrate their plans, he will bring their plans to nothing, he will confuse their languages. We read here in Genesis Chapter Ten that these are the people according to their languages. Well, you may have wondered. Well, I thought the language dispersion happens in the next chapter. This is one of the ways that the Bible, we call it, dischronologizes things, sometimes foreshadows, gets things, prepares us for certain events. It's beginning as we see the world spreading out. Even as it spreads out, we're seeing sin continuing on, and yet God's sovereignty over it. So I want to focus on that this morning. God's sovereiggnty and his power, as we see it in Genesis chapter ten. We see it in a number of ways. Want to point some of them out to you. First, we see it in the context. You remember. After all, God has created the world, that man's sinned and fell and that the world was filled with violence and corruption. God flooded the world and judge those people, Saving Noah and all of these events, we see God's great sovereignty over it. He's capable of doing what he wants, of ruling the world, every aspect of it, according to his good pleasure. We also saw it in the covenant that God made with all the world, this promise, I'm to mankind, the animals and the plants, that he would continue things on a covenant of preservation, that he would continue the world until the last day when Jesus comes in final judgment. But it's not just in the context of Genesis ten, but in specific things in genesis ten. We see it, for example, in the way that he in the naming that goes on here. Now it's true that these people were named by their families, I'm probably their fathers. These name, all of these names that we read. God wasn't necessarily in the delivery room telling them name him this, name her that, although that certainly could have been the case. We see that in other portions of scripture where God does give people their specific names. But even if he's not there in the delivery room, so to speak, he is, I'm sovereign over at all. We see it, for exact example, in the in pae leg when he is born. We read in the his this is verse twenty five to Eber were born two sons. The name of the one was Peleg, which means division, for in his days the earth was divided. His name was division,...

...for in his days the earth was divided. This is one of the ways we see God exercising his sovereignty in the world. These people being named in this way. That brings a testimony not just to that particular person but an entire course of history. How could such a thing be? Certainly no man would be able to predict that kind of thing, unless, of course, God was sovereign over it. We so we see it in this these specific names, and there are others that we might point to as well. But we also see it in the way that the chapter comes to us. God is not here a standing as a stenographer, right. He's not sort of saying, hey, here's some things I went out, I figured out now I want you to know to here's what happened. Thought you might be interested now. That's not how this comes to us. This comes to us as God himself delivering what he has purposed and what has fallen out according to his plans. We remember, after all, that Noah didn't just appear on the scene. He was a son of Adam and Eve, and Adam himself is one who is called a son of God, one who is made of God. These are the generations, therefore, not only of Noah, but of God himself, the father of all people. We see it in other ways too, in the way that the this particular history comes to us. You remember, just before Genesis, chapter ten, that got that a particular event happened. God cursed Canaan, he blessed sem and he blessed JFUV, and we see that the history of the world is falling out according to those lines. Nimrod, this mighty hunter of the Lord, is one who will be established all the great enemies of God's people, Syria, Babylon, Egypt and others. Canaan is also included among the children of him. But in addition to these and that those aspects of the curse, we also see this blessing being given. I'm it's not obvious here in chapter ten, but Luke and Matthew tell us that Jesus is born of Shem's line, that he comes from Peleg and is and and is that promised promised seed. So these histories are falling out according to God's perfect plan. Consider also that this genealogy is not merely a strict record of events. It's not a bear record of facts. It's better to think of it as a story told in a particular way to make a particular point. God, in other words, doesn't simply record one thing after another, but he styleizes all of these genealogies in a very...

...particular way for the very particular point of demonstrating and and confirming his sovereignty. Let me point out some of those things to you. First, at the end of the genealogy we read that there was a kind of selectivity going on in the genealogy. So in Genesis thirty two it says these are the clans of the sons of Noah, according to their genealogies, in their nations, and from these the nation's spread abroad on the earth after the flood. So there's this kind of particularity to it. We also see that it's not a bear record and it doesn't meet all of our assumptions of how genealogies work in other ways. So, for example, the order given here is not necessarily by birth order. There's one place in verse fifteen where it does speak about birth order. Kane and fathered Sidon his firstborn in heath. But there's a kind of reversal of the names here. The genealogies here are given first of JFF, then in Ham and then in Shem. This is the different order than we've seen in other places. So, for example, verse one says Sem, Ham and JFF as opposed to JF HEM and sham or Sheem. There are other things too that we see a going on. Why would God, for example, reverse the order that's always been going on here? Surely there must be some reason. One reason we see is there is a kind of geographical sequence of these genealogies moving in closer and closer to the center of attention, God's people, Israel. It starts out with JFF, these people in these outer boundaries that it moves into ham, the Israel's closest neighbors and most difficult enemies, and finally ends, not necessarily with Israel herself, but that from which Israel would come. There's this kind of focus, the spiraling in that's meant to show God's focus and it and a parallels much of what we see in scripture. We see other things too that shall teach us. This genealogy is ordered according to theology and not a bear record of events. Words for example, like father, son and beget a have some measure of flexibility, not completely. They aren't meaningless, but there's some measure of flexibility. One example in Verse Twenty One. We read to him also the father of all the children of Eber. This is an interesting way of speaking. Notice he's not saying that he's the father of Eber, he's saying he's the father of all the children of Eber. Well, we normally talk about those...

...people as GRANDPA's right, not the father of the children of someone else, but the grandfather of those children. So we hear, we see that father's used in in a slightly flexible way. You see it even more, though, when you continue to read on and find and you find out the Eber, or sorry that Schem, wasn't the grandfather of Eber, but he was the great great grandfather, because the line doesn't go from Shechem to eber to pay leg, but from sem to Arpicashad to Shella to eber then to pay leg. So according to this that we have here, though, it introduces him as the father, or possibly the grandfather of Eber. You read on and is he seems to be the great great grandfather. There's a kind of gaping of generations. That happen. If you compare this genealogy with the genealogy and Luke, we read of yet another person who isn't even mentioned in genesis ten, Canaan. That's C A N A N, another generation between Shem and Eber. So this if we take that genealogy, he's possibly even the great, great great grandfather of Eber. Now this is all probably a little bit technical and maybe uninteresting to you, but the point is simply to say this one thing, and that's that these genealogies, we have to read them as they're written. God has given to them to us in the way that he has decided. We can't take a modern form and the ways that we want to deal with them and impose that on God. We have to take them as they are. And so we ask questions like, well, if God is gaping certain genealogy, certain records, if God is leaving out certain people, what is the purpose of those things? Well, there's various answers we can give. And let me make one point. Notice how Genesis Ten, twenty one jumps to Eber Right, and many of these others it's been more or less just moving on forward so he was the father of this one. WHO's the father of this one? But there's kind of a jump, a sort of foreshadowing, even of just a few verses and twenty one. SEM also the father of all the children of Eber. Why does he talk about that here? Well, it's because there is something very important going on. We did. God wants us to think of Shehem not merely as the father of these particular children, but particularly as the father of the children of Eber. Why? Because there's a division there between Joctam and pay leg. And what's important about that? Well, it's important because, remember, there was a blessing promised to Shem. But we see here that, as with...

Noah and as with Adam and as will happen with Abraham, it's not a straight line. There's kind of a jogging that happens through these genealogies and through God's promises. In other words, when God gives the promise to Adam and Eve, who does that promise come through? The promise of the promise, I mean it comes through seth and not through others. Right, there's a kind of division that happens, that the children of the serpent or the seed of the serpent and the seed of the promise seth and and Kine. You see a similar thing happening with Noah, where the promise is given to Sheem and not to ham. And yet then we see yet another division of the promise, and that's why this point is made here, that chem has both sons of Eb for all the sons of Eber belong to him, both Joctam and Peleg. Through PYLEG will come the Christ, not through Joctam. This is all to point out God's again, his sovereignty in these things, and how, at every point even the people who are receiving the promise must trust in God. They can't guarantee that every child that comes to them will come to them, will be part of the promised people. They must at every point depend on God, depend on his sovereignty, depend on his coming and taking care of them. This Abraham fails at, miserably him and his wife when they seek to bring about the promise in an immoral way again, instead of trusting in God, trusting in his sovereignty, trusting that he will accomplish what he means to do. There's all kinds of other things we might note, and seeing God's sovereignty in this genealogy, but we might summarize it in this way. God wants us to see that his feeling of the world is no accident, that he has complete control over it and he is the one who gets to interpret its history. He gets to define things how he wants to define them, he gets to make the connections that he wants to make, and he does this because there are spiritual connections most important to God and more important than the biological ones. Are Spiritual ones, ones which will eventually be fulfilled in Christ. The last way we've been focusing on the form and some of the details of the genealogy that speak to God's sovereignty. The last way we see it is in the way that God notes the strength of Man, the strength of man as he fills the earth and yet is not threatened by it. Earlier this was in our prayer, our confession of sin. We spoke to God and we asked him to forgive us for fearing man.

Here God recognizes that there are very powerful people in this world, that is the earth is filled. There are people like Nim Rod. Notice the strength of Nim Rod. How God speaks of this man's strength. We read in verse nine or Verse Eight. He was the first on earth to be a mighty man, to be a mighty man. We read on. He was a mighty hunter before Jehovah. Therefore, it is said Nimrod is a mighty hunter before Jehovah. Why this extra line? Well, tells us that Nim rod was so powerful, so strong, that he became kind of a proverb, a sort of way. If you wanted to talk about someone who was really, really strong, really mighty, you would say, well, like Nimrod, mighty hunter before Jehovah, that powerful. And of course we who know how history falls out from here know how powerful he became. These things that he went to did establish. The beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Eric, a cod cal nay, in the land of sin our. From that land he went to a Syrian built Nineveh. It later talks about Egypt. These are the great empires of the world, all of them headed up by this mighty Hunter King Nim Rod. The way that it describes this happening before Jehovah is a way in which saying that God recognizes this man's strength and it's a way of telling us that even when the powers of this world are very strong, that God recognizes it. They are not over Jehovah, but they are before Jehovah, they are under his watchful eye. And so is Israel looks back to this point and sees her enemies, and beginning here, Israel is reminded that all people belong to the Lord and that these particular people belong to the curse. You remember what was prophesied at the end of chapter nine. It was prophesied blessed be Jehovah, the God of Sheem, and let Canaan be his servant. May God in large J ff and let him dwell on the tense of Chechem, and let Canaan be his servant. There's a little bit of tension, isn't there between that prophecy in nine and the very next thing that's set in ten. Do we see Nim rod cowering down before the mighty people of Shem? No, it's just the opposite. We see Nim rod establishing himself as the one who is singled out among all of these people as being particularly mighty, powerful, even proverbiably, proverbially. So...

...how do we account for this tension? How do we deal with it? Will we deal with it in the way that we have been all along. We are called to remember God's sovereignty, remember God's promise that, despite the way things look, despite the powers and the dangers that people face, despite the way it seems that Nim rod and his kingdom from from his father ham are ruling over the world and do come to rule over the world, that God will be victorious. So as we read the genealogy and Genesis ten, the point is for us to see a very simple picture. God sovereign over it as the world spreads out, it spreads out before him, and we need this reminder because we often don't think of life in these terms. Sometimes we think of the world is sort of a nameless mass of people, just this kind of chaotic thing. But that's not the way genesis ten describes the world to us at this time or in times to come. No, it's orderly, isn't it? It's falling out particularly and purposefully according to God's plans. Sometimes, if we don't think that the world is a nameless mass of chaotic people, we are. We think of the particular power of people, the Nimrods of the world, who seem to even reverse their own curse. By their strength, we feel that God is weak and unable to do anything. But Genesis ten forces us to see things in another way, to see that this mighty hunter king who is establishing these great empires is doing so before Jehovah, and not just before God, but before Jehovah, our covenant God, our King Who has established his covenants of grace with us, who is made promises to Adam, to Noah, to Shem, to Abraham, to David, promises that are ultimately fulfilled in Jesus that tell us that Nim rod will not last, God will be sovereign over all his people, all the peoples of the Earth. Let me remind you again of what Psalm thirty three says. Let all the Earth Fear Jehovah, let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him. Jehovah brings the counsel of the nations to nothing, of the nimrods of this world, the babylons, the Assyrius, the roalms. Whatever powers we may face, whatever great cities, will tempt us to give up our Lord, to give up on our confession of faith,...

...to turn to the pleasures and strengths of this world. God says do not fear them, but fear Him who stands forever the plans of his heart to all generations. We read again Psalm thirty three, verse thirteen. Jehovah Looks Down From Heaven and sees all the children of Man. From where he sits enthroned. He looks out on all the inhabitants of the earth, He who fashions the hearts of all of them and observes all their deeds. The king is not saved by his great army. The Warrior is not delivered by his great strength. The war horse is a false hope for salvation and by its great might it cannot rescue. Behold, the eye of Jehovah is on those who fear him and on those who hope in his steadfast love that he may deliver their soul from death and keep them alive in famine. You hear the great promises and truths of our king. You hear this covenant that he's making. He says that these promises that I make to you are stronger than the things that you see, the cities that are powerful, the people that are ruling, the wealth that's being accumulated. Let it go. God is powerful and he will keep his promises. Now, on this word alone, we should trust him. Shehem should have trusted him. His brothers should have heard it and repented and trusted in God. But you, who live all of these generations after these people, have even more. We have the coming of the son of God, in Jesus Christ, who exercises this amazing power on the cross. It's true he went to his death, isn't it? But how does he go to his death? Does he do it kicking and screaming and whining and complaining, frustrated that God didn't keep his promises? No, he goes like a man to the cross. He goes in all the full confidence that God will do as he is promised. He goes step after step after step, not crying out but, let's like scriptures say, like a lamb being led to the slaughter, but not in weakness, mind you, in great power and authority. He goes before kings, he goes before Herod, he goes before pilot, he goes before this nation, the Great King of all the world, and he goes to the cross not to be defeated, but to defeat, not to be made a mockery forever, but to be victory over all things. He does this, doesn't he? On the Cross? He dies, yes, but what does he die for? To forgive our sins, to rule over us, to conquer Satan, to...

...put down all authorities and principalities and powers, to crush that serpent under his feet, this promise seed, who is kept by God's sovereign power and his promises of grace from generation to generation to generation, comes to the point of Jesus Christ. And you know what? It doesn't divide any more. It doesn't split at Jesus Christ and to the seed of the serpent and into the seed of the promise. That's it. If you belong to Jesu, Jesus Christ, end of story. If your faith is in him, then you have victory over everything and overall people. You are, you belong to the great family of God, not in only an earthly and in a visible way, but in an eternal and internal way, and you belong so forever and ever. This is God's sovereign grace, in his power, and this is why we can stare death in its face. Why, as the Psalm, going back to Psalm thirty three, says, behold, the eye of Jehovah is on those who fear him. To fill that out with more scriptures, to say on those who fear him and trust in Jesus to keep them, protect them, those who hope in his steadfast love, is given to us in Jesus Christ, that he may deliver their soul from death. Psalm thirty three NDS. This way, our soul waits for Jehovah. He is our help and our shield, for our heart is glad in him because we trust in his holy name. Let Your Steadfast Love, Oh Jehovah, be on us, even as we hope in you. Let us pray.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (631)