Covenant Words
Covenant Words

Episode · 6 years ago

The Doctrine of Election (Romans 9:6-29)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Rev. Christopher Chelpka

If you would please a remain standing, and let's turn to Romans, Chapter Nine, verses six through twenty nine. The Romans Nine, verses six through twenty nine. This is God's word. Let's give our attention to the reading of it. But it is not as though the word of God has failed, for not all who are descended from Israel belong to Israel, and not all our children of Abraham, because they are his offspring. But through Isaac shall your offspring be named. This means that it is not the children of the flesh who are the children of God, but the children of the promise are counted as offspring, for this is what the promise said about. This time next year, I will return and Sarah shall have a son, and not only so, but also when Rebecca had conceived children by one man, our forefather Isaac, though they were not yet born and had done nothing either good or bad, in order that God's purpose of election might continue, not because of works, but because of him who calls. She was told the older will serve the younger. As it is written, Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated. What shall we say then? Is there injustice on God's part? It by no means. For he says to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I have mercy. I will have compassion on whom I have compassion. So then it depends not on human will or exertion, but on God, who has mercy. For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, for this very purpose, I have raised you up that I might show my power in you and that my name might be proclaimed in all the earth. So then he has mercy on whomever he wills and he hardens whomever he wills. You will say to me. Then, why does he still find fault? For who can resist his will? But who are you, Oh man, to answer back to God? Will what is molded say to the MOLDER? Why have you made me like this? Has the potter no right, over the clay, to make out of the same lump one vessel for honorable use and another for dishonorable use? What if God, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience vessels of wrath prepared for destruction in order to make known the riches of his glory, for vessels of mercy which he has prepared beforehand for glory even us whom he has called, not from the Jews only, but also from the gentiles, as indeed he says in Josiah. Those who were not my people, I will call my people, and her who was not my beloved, I will call my beloved, and in the very place it was said to them, you are not my people. There they will be called sons of the Living God, and Isaiah cries out concerning Israel, though the number of the sons of Israel be as the sand of the sea, only a remnant of them will be saved, for the Lord will carry out his sentence upon the earth fully and without delay. And, as Isaiah predicted, if the Lord of hosts had not left US offspring, we would have been like Sodom and become like go mour. This end us the reading of God's word, that you may be seated. Up until this point in the book of Romans, Paul has been explaining to us what God has done in salvation through his son. He tells us who we are, as those who are born under God and accountable to him, those who understand his law know it, both Jew and...

...gentile, as those who have sinned against God, who have exchanged the glory of God for creatures and creeping things, things that have he got, the Creator has made. He's shown us how our sin is making us. Our sin has created the situation in which we've all fallen short of the glory of God and which none of us can stand before a God and say you owe me, in fact, the only thing that God owes us. Paul has taught us his judgment and his wrath, but at the same time, Paul has said in so many ways and so clearly that there is a salvation that has come into the world, salvation in Jesus Christ, one who has come, who was this promised child of Abraham, who is the fulfillment of the Covenant Promises, who has given us his very spirit and has blessed US beyond anything we can imagine, such that those who stand in Jesus Christ, who believe in him, Paul says, there is no condemnation anymore. We stand before God as those who can share in his glory, who look forward to the glories of the new heavens and the new earth because of what Jesus has done. And all this is simply given to us freely by God. We don't work for it. We don't strive for it, we don't pay our debts off. These kinds of things are impossible, but God gives us to them out of His grace and out of his mercy and out of his love. There are questions, though, that come up, questions particularly concerning the Jews, and Paul wants to address these old for these next three chapters, over chapters nine, ten and eleven, and this is a really wonderful thing. Jesus Christ is common. Something has happened by and large, when Jesus was when Jesus came, he was rejected by his own people. He and then in Paul and sending Paul out and others to go preach the Gospel to the gentiles, he starts bringing in New People. It creates this question. Well, what do we make of all of these covenants and promises and the giving of the law and everything that Paul listed in verses four and five that we've been focusing on in the past few weeks? What do we make of all of those things? What of the Jews? How do we understand them? Well, these three chapters God opens up his plan of salvation to us. He helps us to understand what's going on why it's going on and how it will come to pass. Just as a caveat. I'm God of course did this in his wisdom and he reveals to US perfectly exactly how much we need to know. Not Anymore, not any less. This is a good reminder, I think, because we're often pressing God for four things that he won't tell us. We often press God and feel like we're owed somehow the different things, knowledge of his plan and and many times God says it's not up to you to know these things, it's not up to you to know why I'm doing this or why I'm doing that. And yet, at the same time, in the very pages of scripture, these things that these bibles that sit by our night stands and on ourselves and on our phones, we have so ready access to God's plan, to what he's doing, why he's doing it, his purposes. He tells us things and we should pay attention, and that's what he does in these three chapters. He tells us what he's doing, why he's doing it, he explains some of the background of...

...all that's been going on, all the things that have happened in history. Now let me remind you and warn you as and you will will approach this in this chapter. God tells us these things. He tells us his plan, not so that we can inspect it and decide whether or not we want to approve of it. I'm God doesn't submit his work to us like a student submits a test to his teacher and says, here, what do you think? What? WHAT GRADE DO I get? Do you approve or not? No, God submits his plan to us that we might be filled with humility, with gratitude, with the fear of the Lord. He doesn't submit his plan to us. He is his plan to us. This knowledge of himself and of his will he gives to us as a act of grace and of love. It's like when children are maybe struggling to understand what's going on in a household in the parents set them down and say, Hey, family meeting time. We need to explain to you a few things that are going on now. Parents, they may not tell you everything. Kids, you might not hear every particular detail and everything that's going on, but when your parents do this kind of thing, it's because they love you, they want to bring you into something and understanding of something. They want to bless you, and that's what God does hear. And what he does is he causes us, he asks us, he gives us an opportunity to meditate on his great sovereignty. In chapter nine he calls us to meditate on his election, not as a student turning in a test, not as a bully trying to offend us and push us away, but as a father, drawing US close to him so that he m so that we might know him, so that we might fear him, so that we might love him, so that we might be grateful for the things that he's done. Now, despite these good purposes and teaching us and talking to us about his election, why he chooses some in Israel and not in is real, why you choose, as some gentiles and not other gentiles, despite these good purposes that God has, many people do struggle with this chapter, struggle with Romans chapter nine. I don't think it's so much an understanding it, but in understanding and accepting its implications. And this was a very true for me personally. I don't often share personal stories, but I will so hear in the hope that it will be helpful to you. Romans nine came to me I don't know if I'd really read it before until someone in college I came to me and told me about some of my friends, some mutual friends, and they were talking, Maybe Gossiping, and said, you know, they're calvinists, and I said they're calvinists, what does that mean? And they said, Oh, well, that means that people don't have they's at someone who believes that you don't have to really believe in Jesus. It means that God has this certain number of people that he elects and then he saves them and it doesn't really matter what they do or what they don't do. On this person continued, sort of vehemently to explain that this creates it's this doctrine creates a kind of theology of robots. God elects these people. They have nothing to do with it, and so they they're basically robots. They they God has complete, powerful over them, and this in turn takes away all desires for missions, for prayer, for sharing the Gospel with other people, for good works. And you know what I said, that's terrible. That is terrible. Our friends believe...

...these things. I couldn't believe it and I was really concerned. These are my friends, that I loved, I cared about, and they were being pulled in by this very dangerous doctrine. Well, because I cared about my friends, I asked them about this. I talked to them and they said I started talking to me and I said, well, this is things were reading in scripture and you should read them too. And one of them, they one of the things that I was pointed to, is Romans nine. Now, Romans Nine, among other passages, sort of approached me in this particular way that God's word hadn't before. This was a particular time in my life when I was taking God's word very seriously. I wanted to understand it, I wanted to know it. I was a Christian, I wanted to hear God, I wanted to believe what he would have me believe, do what he had would have me do. And so I'm reading Romans nine and I'm reading things like it as it is written. Jacob I have loved, but Esau I have hated. I read things is like in verse eleven, though they were not born yet and nothing had done, nothing, either good or bad, in order that God's purpose of election might continue, not because of works but because of him who calls, she was told the other older shall serve the younger, or verse eighteen. So then he has mercy on whomever he wills and hardens whomever he heartens. Approaching this I though, I read it many times and there were particular things I asked questions about, I would try to look up in commentaries. The more I read it, the more it just the sort of very plainly stated. The Westminster Confession of faith says that not all things in scripture are equally clear, they're not all equally understandable, and that's true. There are very difficult parts of scripture to understand, some that require a lot of work, a lot of study, but I don't think this is one of them. This is one of those chapters. This is one of those plassages in scripture, especially taken as a whole, that just gets to the point and speaks very plainly. And what I found in myself the more I read that's chapter, the more I thought about it and the what and how it fit into the rest of the context of Romans, the more I found how my problem and my disagreements was. It wasn't in what it said but in the implications. I thought it men well, what does it say? Let's go through it briefly. In versus one through five, Paul expresses his feelings, he expresses his feelings about his his people, and in so doing he lays aside any objection that someone would have to this doctrine of election, that he points out, any objection that would say, well, Paul's just saying this because he doesn't care about his people anymore, or at Paul saying this because he doesn't think the Jews are important, or Paul saying this because he doesn't cont God, because he thinks God doesn't continue to love Israel anymore. All these objections are set aside. And Verses One through five, I didn't read them before, so I'll read them now. Paul says, I'm speaking the truth in Christ, I am not lying. My conscience spares me. Witness in the Holy Spirit that tells us he's speaking strongly. Here he's swearing an oath. Essentially, he's saying, listen to me, I'm not lying, I'm telling you the truth. And what does he say? That I have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart, for I could wish that I myself were accursed and cut off from...

Christ for the sake of my brothers, my kinsman. According to the flesh, they are the Israelites and to them belong the adoption, the glory, the Covenant, the giving of the law, the worship and the promises. To Them Belong the Patriarchs, and from their race, according to the Flesh, is the Christ, who is God over all, blessed forever. Amen. Paul cares. Paul cares deeply, so much so that he says, if it were possible for me to be cut off from Christ for my brothers, I would unceasing anguish in his heart. Paul cares. And does Paul think the Jews are important? Absolutely. He gives us this great litany of all these gifts, these massive gifts that God has given to this people, the chief among them being Christ, who is God, not over the gentiles but over all, Jews and gentiles. When Jesus Christ comes, he doesn't throw away the people of God forever, that the Israelites. He continues to love them. He has not failed, as he says in verse six, but it is not as though the word of God has failed. The promises to the Patriarchs, the covenants that were made, the direction to which the law pointed, the reasons for worship, all of these things, the glory of God, the adoption he brought them into, these things didn't fail ail. When Jesus Christ came and the preaching of the Gospel went into the world, they achieved their highest point. They came into into fulfillment. So Paul lays aside these objections and talking about what happened with Israel. God doesn't throw this people away. He God gives them the culminating gift of everything he's been doing since Adam and eve and, as we see in this chapter, even before that. That's versus one through five, then in verses six through seven. Paul argues that why some believe in Christ and others reject him, why some are saved and others are hardened. This is not new. This has been going on for a long time. That God's people, this sense of who is Israel has always been understood on two levels. There's Israel and then there's Israel. There is Israel and then there are those who truly, spiritually, personally deeply belong to Israel. There are those who belong to it in an outward and temporary sense, in a way because they are of Abraham, there of his offspring, they are born of the flesh. But then there is Israel that come through the PROMUS. There are those who believed and what Abraham believed, who belong to God. Why does this happen? This gets to the plan and the purpose, the foundation of all of this. God says it's because of his choices. It's because of his will. Not Because of the will of Abraham, not because of the will of Isaac, not because of the will of Jacob, not because of the will of Esaw, because of the will of God, not because of the works of men, as it says in verse eleven, but because of him who calls and he gives these proofs in by using these historical examples in scripture. He says, look at Isaac. Through Isaac shall your offspring be named. And that's what happened. The children of flesh were born through Isaaac, and again it happened...

...with Isaac to it was through his son's as will. There were two sons. Neither had done good or evil before both were born. God chose one. I the younger or sorry, the old. The older will serve the younger. This is what he says to Rebecca, and that is indeed what happened. And then when we get into all the details of the story, you remember Jacobs not some awesome guy who's just this massively holy person that God sort of sees and says, wow, look at faith of Jacob, I am going to bestow on him my love. Jacob is a Niver fief in some ways, a manipulator, does all kinds of terrible things, but the principle stands. I will have mercy on whom I have mercy. God doesn't Love Jacob either because he's sinful. That's not the reason God loves him. He loves him because he loves him. He loves him because he says that one's mine, and we don't know why, except that it was God's will. And we know that it's because we're talking about in the category of mercy. It's not something that God owed to Jacob or to Esau. Neither one of them were deserved the mercy of God, but God gave it nevertheless. So this is what he says in verses six through twelve. He points at the very history of Israel, the progression of the covenants, the Progression of the Patriarchs and the promises is. It all leads up to Christ and he says this is how it's always been, this is the way that it is, this is how God does things for a particular reason, in order that God's purpose of election might continue. God has a purpose and he wants it to continue and he makes it known to us. This is the wonderful thing about election. It not it doesn't merely exist, but it is revealed. There are many things that exist that we do not know about. Some of them we discover regularly. I am I think about the oceans, for example, crazy creatures, strange fish and animals, and I probably even other classifications that I don't know, living and swimming and dwelling down deep on the bottom of the ocean that none of us have ever seen or will ever see. Maybe someone from a long time from now we'll discover something new, and yet there it is, existing while yet to be revealed. This is true not only of creation, but of other things to God's will, eternal principle, spiritual things. We're waiting for the revelation of the new heavens and the new earth. We're waiting for the coming of Jesus Christ. There are things that are planned purposed exist but we don't see them. But here God tells us about his purpose of election. He reveals this deep water kind of thing so that we might know it and see it and believe it. God does things this way, not only to do them in that way, but he tells us about them. Well, once establishing this principle, he has mercy, on whom he has mercy. He hardens whom he hardens. This is the prerogative of God. Paul then answers a couple objections. First, verses fourteen through eighteen. First he answers this objection about injustice. What shall we say then? Is there injustice on the part of God? In other words,...

...when God is saying Jacob, I choose Esaw A don't, I don't. Can we go and stand before God and say that's not fair? Can we say to God that you are being unjust unfair in your election? What does God say? It's very clear. By no means because God does what he does. He has mercy on whom he has mercy. He has compassion on whom he has compassion. Verse Fifteen. Then the principle behind it. Verse Sixteen. It depends not on human will or exertion, but on god, whom he excuse me, but on God whom has mercy. It gets back to this point that I was making earlier. God is showing mercy. He's not rewarding people, he's not sort of looking at people who all sort of stand their mutually and are asking for something and or he's rewarding these things or good works or whatever. No, God is giving something to people, something they don't deserve. Well, I suppose you could call that injustice if you have to, but do we really want to call that injustice, to say that God has given me His grace when I didn't deserve it? Now we call that grace, we call that mercy, and we know too that behind that grace and mercy there is justice. It's not as though God sweeps the smit sins under the rug and say, well, I'm not going to pay out justice this time. No, he does pay them out, he does seek retribution and justice. He is good in that way. It's just that he doesn't do it in us, but he does it in Jesus, on himself. So is there injustice and God? Are we going to look at the cross on whom he's pouring out the his own wrath so that we might not endure it and say well, that's not fair, of course not. Well then, versus ninth, nineteen through the end, he says this other objection. Will you say to me then? Why does he find fault for who can resist his will? In other words, it's this subjection. If God is electing some and not electing others, Paul says there's this thought that you might have, that I certainly had when I first bumped into this doctrine. Well, how can God, if he's choosing some and not choosing others, make me accountable for my sins or for his choices? Well, that's a big topic, but there's a simple point that Paul wants to make, that you should let settle in your hearts, and that I had to let settle in my heart, and it's this verse twenty. But who are you, Oh man, to answer back to God? He essentially says you don't have a right to ask that question. There's no such thing as a stupid question. Well, we appreciate what teachers mean when the they say this. They're trying to encourage us to talk and be brave and explore and learn, but it's also true that there are such things as stupid questions and this is one of them. To Go to God and say, Hey, that's not fair. How can you find fault with me when we know our ends, when we know how much we've offended him, how far we fallen short of...

...his glory, when we know how supreme he is, how sovereign he is, how majestic and Almighty he and his will is. And then Paul explains this using an example. A clay, a piece of clay being molded by a potter. Does it have a right to to stand up and say, why are you doing this to me? It's a silly thing, because clay doesn't even do that. The created clay doesn't answer back to the Creator, the one who's molding and making the pot and yet we do. That's what we do. We stand on the plotting wheel as the clay and say to God, how come? That's not fair, that's not I don't like that. You're unjust. Paul essentially says, shot up. Who are you, Oh man, to answer back to God? Will what is molded say to the MOLDER, why have you made me like this? Has the potter no right over the clay to make what he wants. Of course he does. God has every right. It's his plan, it's his mercy, it's our sins. And then he points out prophecies from Josiah, from Isaiah, showing that this has been God's purpose all along, to call the only from the Jews, but also from the from the gentiles. You know, it's amazing to me, though, is he not only says to us sit down and be quiet, but then, after telling us that, he answers the question, even after telling us you have no right to answer that, ask that question, he says. Well, what if God, Verse Twenty Two, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience, vessels of Wrath prepared for destruction in order to make known the riches of his glory, for vessels of mercy which he is prepared beforehand for glory? This doesn't tell us everything about God's will, but it tells us something that what God is doing, in making some pots this way, in some pots this way, in choosing some and not choosing others, is he's working things for his own glory, for his power, so that he might be exalted and we who are caught up in that who are brought along in the riches of his glory, we find joy and salvation. We find that God is doing these things in order to make them known to us, another way of putting it, as the unbeliever is not a person who's going to be asking God, why are you not saving me? Because God says to that person, believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and you will be saved. This is freely offered to you, and the Christian who has been saved is the last person who should be asking God, why have you made me like this? Right? Why have you made me a vessel of mercy and shows of me in your great love and kindness? Isn't that unfair and unjust? Do you see why this is crazy talk? We who have been made vessels of mercy, we who have been cared and loved and who are caught up in the riches of his glory, when we hear about God's purposes of election, we fall on our knees and we say, well, this is an...

...amazing thing you have done. The doctrine of election should not cause us to stand like indignant children with our hands on our hips, but it should cause us to fall on our faces before a merciful God and worship him. It took me a while to get to that point, though. When I was first reading Romans Nind it was a struggle. I remember struggling reading it over and over, and the more I read at the more plain it seemed to me, the more I couldn't get around these very plain truths. But as a Christian, I found myself in a place where simply had to submit. I mean, what other option do we have as Christians? Are we going to say, well, God said it, but yeah, that's okay, I'm just not going to believe it. I'm going to do something else. We approach God's word, we we believe it, we do it, whether we like it or not. That's obviously not the best attitude, but it's better than not doing it. It's better than refusing him, and that's the place I found myself in. In some ways, I kind of not to compare myself to Abraham, but sometimes I imagine. I imagine Abraham being in a similar situation when God told him to sacrifice his song God. Abraham didn't understand the plan. He didn't know that the ram would be provided, he didn't know what God was doing and all these kinds of things. There's a lot of it that didn't make sense. The implications of sacrificing your son, the son of promise, even how do you get your head around that? But Abraham, as a faithful as one who trusted God and believed him and so and and belong to him, he says okay, and that's what he did. He went forward, and that's what I tried to do and that's what I would encourage you to do whenever you bump into any doctrine of scripture, whenever you see something so plainly taught in God's word, even if you don't understand all the implications, even if you don't can't work it all out in your mind, when something is plainly and clearly taught, when you are called to believe something or called to do something, we should be like Abraham. We stand up and we say yes, Lord and we trust him. And you know what, God is good and just like with Abraham and with me and I think perhaps many of you, in our lives, when we go forward in a faithful submission and obedience, he begins to make clear some of these things to us. Not Always, God, ever, lays all his cards out on the table and says here is everything I'm going to do and every kind and every way. Even if he did, we wouldn't be able to understand it hold it all together in our minds. But he does tell us things, he does help wrap things up and he grows US and helps us to understand the implications, and that's true of election as well. The more that I understood the doctrine of election and the more that people do, not just me, you'll find these wonderful comforts and assurances. As I've said and hinted at already, it moves us from a posture of obstinence to a posture of love and worship and prostration, of humbling ourselves before God. When God says here is the House of salvation and it sits on this foundation of election, we find that it's no longer theologically speaking and as we conceive...

...of our salvation. It's no longer sitting on the sifting sands of our works or our faith. Let me read to you a few of these lines that we sang earlier from sixty one. Thy Work Alone, O Christ, can ease the weight of sin. Thy Blood alone, a lamb of God, can give me peace within. Thy Love to me, Oh Christ, not mine, O Lord to Thee, can rid me of this dark unrest and set my spirit free. Well, that work of Christ is not just the work on the cross in time and space, but it's his will from all eternity to choose us. This is why, this is why our salvation depends not on us, not on what my hands have done. I love this line in the first verse. Not what I feel or do can give me peace with God. Not all my prayers and sighs and tears can bear my awful load. It means that our salvation is not based on the greatness of our faith. It means the salvation is not based on how well we pray or read the scriptures or how well we execute God's decre his will is commands in our lives. Because if we if that's what our salvation depends on, if our salvation depends on our works or our work somehow mixed with God's grace, anything in there, it creates a kind of crumbling. So the foundation. God says, that's not the way it is. Your Salvation stands only and always on me and my perfect will, and that should bring comfort and assurance. It means that we who walk into that door, that door of Jesus Christ, into this House of salvation, we're not going to slip and fall. It's not going to fall out from underneath of us when our prayers are less than good, when we find ourselves falling into sin. It means that we stand forever on God and his will, as Jesus says, and John Ten none that the father has given me will I lose, not one. No one can snatch them out of my father's hand. They belong to me and I have kept them and I will keep them. Another implication of the doctrine of election means that we give all glory to God. All boasting and on ourselves is taken away. It means that in Salvation God gets all the glory. And what other way should we desire? It as Christians? Makes US gratitude, it fills us with worship, it gives us a deep sense of the deep grace of the Gospel that God has chosen us before we have done anything good or bad, that even in spite of our sin, in spite of our works, God has had mercy and compassion on us. That is good news. That is deep grace, and that relates to things like prayer missions. In our prayer we go on our knees and we pray to God and we say, Lord, do the things that I am unable to do. I'm leaning on you, I'm depending on you because you're the rock of ages, because your will is set from all eternity, because the salvation is from you and not from me. We can and go to a god and depend on him because he is dependable, because he's not shifting and changing, because he's what he decides, is is what he decides and because of the grace of the Gospel, the certainty of God, it means that in missions, we go confidently forward, knowing that the lost will be reached,...

...knowing that it depends not on the eloquence of our words or the particular tricks we use or the particular method, but it depends on God. Romans ten will talk about people going forward preaching the Gospel so that all will believe those truths are based on the certainty of God's grace. We go out into the world looking for our brothers and sisters, people that have been elected from all eternity. We go not trying to figure out which one is which is this person electors this person? Not? Oh, I think they might be all. Preach the Gospel to them. Know, when we invite people to come into this great's healths of salvation. This is borrowing, by the way, from a an analogy that our be Kuiper uses in the sovereignty of God and evangelism. I think is the title of the book, something like that. Ourgue urb Kuiper says when we when we point people to salvation, where do we point them? The foundation of the House. Well, at the door Jesus we say come in, come in, you're invited to come in. When they come in, we say look at the floor and we can tell him ahead of time. You know, we could say look at the floor, this is a strong house, this is a strong foundation. You're safe, you're secure. All who come to Jesus Christ belong in him and will forever. But we don't point them at the foundation say figure out whether you belong to God or not and then decide. We're not supposed to find out the secret will of God. Were called to believe. And so that's our response to the Gospel and it's what we call people to as well. We go into the world with confidence in this task. Then, boasting not in our work but in pride and hope and confidence in the work of God, we say this House of salvation is strong, the door is open, come on in, and they do, and when they come inside we see our brothers and sisters and we rejoice at the mercy of God. I could go on all afternoon, but the point is this, that the implications of the doctrine of election are good and many. We don't need to suffer under it, we don't need to fight against it or submit with a kind of you know, lip that sticks out and go to our room kind of frustrated and pouting. We say thank you, we worship and we go forward in the confidence of the God, that the that the God's work in the Gospel, will be done, that God has not thrown his people aside, but that through him or through them and through his purpose of election, he has been drawing them to himself and growing his church ever since the beginning, and he continues to do that today. If you are here and you don't know Jesus, then come into this house, come into this family, knowing that your salvation is secure from beginning to end, from eternity, from everlasting, everlasting, come in, enjoy, belong and know the mercy of God that is given to you. And, if you are already inside, enjoy yourself, praise God, worship him and thank him for his sovereign work in your life, work that you didn't deserve, but work that you have received.

Nevertheless, let us pray.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (646)