Covenant Words
Covenant Words

Episode 631 · 2 months ago

The Gospel of Luke #22

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Luke 5:33-39

In Father, we come to your word. And Lord, this is important, for it is your word, and it's important that I carefully exposit it to your people, and that I do not try to go to the writer to the left, but that I try God to be faithful to the text. Lord, you were teaching some marvelous things in this text, and I don't want to mess it up, but I do want to emphasize what you were trying to teach us. And so Lord, I pray that as I read your word, and as I exposited to your people, that you would help me to have grace to do it rightly, Lord, and to indeed to be able to speak to your people in such a way that will edify, exhort and comfort them. And so Lord, we ask for your spirit, Oh Holy Spirit, please not only illuminate and anoint your word, Boord, but that which follows as well. Keep me from sin, keep me from falsehood and deceit, but help me to preach your true word. We ask these things in Christ's name. Amen. Our text this morning comes to us from Luke chapter five. The end of the chapter, we're going to be looking at Versus thirty three to thirty nine Luke Chapter five, thirty three the thirty nine here is God's word. And they said to him, the disciples of John fast often and offer prayers and do and so do the disciples of the Pharisees. But yours eat and drink. And Jesus said to them, can you make wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in those days. He also told to them a parable. No one tears a piece from a new garment and puts it on an old garment. If he does, he'll tear the new, and the piece from that new will not match the old. And no one puts new wine into old wine skins. If he does, the new wine will burst the skins, and it will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. But new wine must be put into fresh wine skins. And no one, after drinking old wine desires new, for he says the old is good. Since the reading of God's word, please be seated. So this morning we come to the end of Luke chapter five, chapter that I think has had a lot to teach us much for us to look at in our last text, we saw the call of Levi. We saw that after he had been converted, he uh calls this major feast and invites all of his friends, who, as we looked at, are basically the low life of society because text collectors didn't have friends in the upper echelon, so he would invite all of these people that many people would not want to be acquainted with, but Levi invites them. And so this morning we have the third confrontation between Jesus and the...

Pharisees, and these confrontations will continue into the next chapter as well. There's two more coming up in chapter six. But let's start by looking here at verse thirty three, it says they said to him. Now we might assume from that, and it says they that it's referring to the same group as in verse thirty where it identifies them as the Pharisees and the and their scribes. But in Matthew's account he says it is the disciples of John who actually come to Christ. With his question, Mark's account combines them says, now John's disciples and the Pharisees were fasting, and people came and said to him, why do John's disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast? So there is no contradiction here. It's just that different writers want to emphasize different groups that are coming to Christ. And it just happens at this time that both of the groups, the Pharisees and also the Disciples of John, are fasting at this time, and they come therefore with his question that that he has now the reason for the joining together. Calvin says that maybe the Pharisees are attempting to draw the disciples of John away from Jesus and into their party, which they could be doing, and he draws this application Calvin does. He said, this example reminds us that prudence and caution are necessary to prevent wicked and cunning men from sowing divisions among us on any slight ground. Now what we might question, though, is why would the disciples of John. I mean, we understand the Pharisees, but why would the disciples of John be coming to Jesus to question him? After all, John pointed his disciples to Jesus, he said, has he pointed at him? Look? Behold, this is the lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world. He said, he must increase and I must decrease. So why why are they are questioning Christ here? Well, we have to remember a couple of things. Number One, remember John was an ascetic. John was someone who lived in the wilderness, ate very little, probably often fasted as well, and so they would, of course his disciples would wonder about that. Why why would Jesus be doing a different kind of lifestyle. And Jesus refers to this in Matthew eleven, eighteen and nineteen. John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say he has a demon. The son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, look at him, a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners. Yet wisdom is justified by your deeds. So it would very likely be that the disciples of John, as disciples of a teacher will often do, they'll of the practice of their master, and so they of course would...

...follow the ascetic practices of John. And so they might wonder why is it that Jesus is not following that particular procedure. The other thing we got to remember is that although John did point out to his disciples that Jesus was the Lamb of God. Not all of his disciples were present at that time. In fact, we're gonna come, well, we won't, but you can when you go further in your Bible upon a group in x nineteen of disciples of John who didn't know anything about the Gospel or the Holy Spirit. And so of course there's going to be some of those here. And also we note that John was really the last prophet of the Old Covenant and Jesus the first of the New. There is one other possibility for the fasting, however, that I'll just mention. We can't prove this. We don't know exactly because Luke doesn't tell us things that strict chronological order. We don't know exactly when John actually died at the hands of of Herod. We know about the story, but we don't know when. And some postulated perhaps, uh, the disciples were fasting in mourning because of the death of John. The possibility but certainly not provable. And this is a question of practice. This is not a question of obedience to the law. It's not that at all. The law only required and kind of obliquely, uh not not really clear, But the law only requires fasting of the Jews one day in the year. That day, as I'm sure many of you know, is the day of Atonement. That was the day, and there it says, and it shall be a statute to you forever, that in the seventh month, on the tenth day of the month, you shall afflict yourselves and shall do no work either the native of the stranger who sojourns among you. In that term, afflict yourself is the term for fasting. But from practice, what it appears by this time is both of the disciples of John and the disciples of the Pharisees were practicing regular fasting at this point. You might remember when Jesus tells the parable of the tax collector and the Pharisee. One of the things that Pharisee says is I fast twice a week, and those two fast would have been Monday and Thursday that they fasted together. James Edwards says, although not a legal requirement except on the day of Atonement, fasting had become in Jesus day a prerequisite of religious commitment, a sign of atonement of sin and humiliation and penitence before God, and as a general aid to prayer, and there were uh aids and their writings that would tell people particular times they ought to fast, and remembrance is perhaps of national disasters, is when the tempo had been destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar, And even during times of crisis, fasting would be perhaps um given by the leadership that they should and and there might be just...

...practical reasons that one might fast. But the danger of fasting, like anything else, like it is it can lead people, which just does here to these people, to a kind of works righteousness, to justifying yourself by works, which is not the gospel that Jesus comes to do. And so um we have them coming to the Lord. And remember our Lord had just recently finished a forty day fast, okay, so he could have easily said to them, which he didn't. But he could have said, fasting. You asked me about fasting, let me tell you about fasting. And he could have he could have enlightened them upon how much he fasted, but he didn't do that. What he does is he simply exonerates his disciples from the charge that they're making. As I mentioned, we read earlier that Isaiah had warned about fasting become a works righteousness, as we read this morning where they said, why we fast and humbled ourselves, and you take no knowledge of it. In other words, Lord, we're doing the works you've commanded, so you should bless us because of that. Jeremiah said in chapter fourteen, verse twelve, though they fast, I will not hear their cry. And it seems from what Jesus says in a sermon on amount that the Pharisees had come up with a pretty good way to show people that they were indeed fasting, so you could look at them and say, oh, look at the way they look, they must be fasting. So they made certainly made it into a works righteousness for sure. So in verse thirty four, Jesus begins by taking an example from cultural practice. Now, it is traditional in our culture to have a wedding dinner following the wedding ceremony. That's normally the practice, and maybe a dance as well, that we'll have that. But in the days of Christ it went a lot further than that. Um a wedding party, not talking about the people in the wedding, but a wedding celebration could last even up to two weeks that they were there. That they were there, the normal procedure would be a seven day celebration for a virgin bride and three days for a widow. So the one time that no one, not even a Pharisee would think about fasting, was during a wedding. You would never ever do that. And you might know that in the Greek when you ask a question, you can ask a question in such a way that you're anticipating what the result and the answer is going to be. In that so I could paraphrase christ question here to say, you wouldn't make the wedding guest fast when the bridegroom is with them? Would you therefore anticipating a no answer? Uh? In regards to that, And Chris Asten thought that Jesus took this example of him being the bridegroom directly from John the Baptist. Calvin says,...

I have no objection to that view, but I did not think it rests on solid grounds. But remember John the Baptist said, the one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. And so there John made the correlation that Jesus was the bridegroom. And then he says very interesting comment. He says, while the bridegroom is with them. Now it has been noted that nowhere in the Old Testament is the Messiah ever referred to as the bridegroom. But there is someone who is referred to as the bridegroom, and that is God. God is referred to that Isaiah five, I will be troth you to me forever. I will betroth you to me in righteousness and injustice, in steadfast love and mercy. And of course the book of Josiah that's kind of built around that, and I will betroth you to me forever. I will betroth you to me. Uh well, actually I copied the same verse there, but it's in jose I won't take the time to look it up. But um. But again, that whole book of jose has kind of written around the idea of Josea taking a wife and all that goes along with that. So Jesus, by saying that he is the bridegroom, is not saying necessarily that he is the Messiah, but what he is saying by saying he is the bridegroom, is he saying he is God? So Jesus is the bridegroom, which means Jesus must be God. So in verse thirty, kind of a distressing thought, okay, He tells him the days are going to come when the bridegroom will be taken away from them. And this begun several statements in the Ministry of Jesus where he talks about being destined to be killed. This is the first one that we have in the Gospel of Luke. And the word taken away, the bridegroom will be taking away, taken away. That's that's a strong word in Greek. It indicates taken away by force, by an act of violence. And so Christ will be taken from his disciples and taken violently. We can think of Isaiah fifty three eight by oppression and judgment he was taken away and as his force generation who considered that he was cut off from the land of a living stricken for the transgression of my people. Or Zachary thirteen seven. Awake, o sword against my shepherd, against the man who stands next to me, declares the Lord of hosts, strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered. I would turn my hand against the little ones. But we have no idea here or indication that the disciples are actually picking up on that at this particular time. But the point the Lord is making is usually at a wedding feast, the people that go away are the guests. They're the ones that begin to go away. But Jesus has saying in this case, it's going to be different. The bride group is actually going to be taken away from the guest.

And then he says, and in those days, my disciples were fast. The question is what does he mean by that? Come back to that in a little bit. Let's look at the versus thirty six or thirty eight. We've been looking at parables that are fellowship groups that I'm leading, and here Jesus gives us two of the shortest parables that we have. Um, I could say, I could say even that this whole idea of the wedding feast and the wedding uh and the groom and all of that is also a parable of sorts. But the parable and verse thirty six concerns two pieces of fabric and old and a new now when I read it this morning in the attack, some of you might have picked up on it, because I think we're much more used to hearing the way it's phrased in Matthew or Mark than it is in Luke. And you might have said, oh, wait a minute, I don't think that's what he said. It seems like he said something else. So in Matthew and Mark, the point is that if you put a new garment that is not shrunk, they didn't have pre shrunk in those days. And if you if you have, if you take a new garment and you put it on an old one to patch it, when when that new piece would start to shrink, it would tear away from from the old piece. That's the point that he makes in those uh in those gospels. But in Luke the point seems to be more. By taking a path from a new garment, you're ruining the new garment, and the piece that you're gonna put on the old one will not even match that one. And that seems to be the point here. Now you might say, well, you know, why why does it say something in Matthew and Market says something different than Luke? And you know again, is their contradiction. No, Jesus is just doing what what good pastors do or should do. Now, Um, what we do sometimes, And I've gone to other churches and and filled in for them. I'm almost all. I've almost always preached sermons that I've preached before. Um, I haven't done that here. I determined that I wouldn't do it because I knew I needed to keep my feet to the fire and studying and doing those things. So I determined I would continue on the series I've been preaching before I came here. Um, which is too bad for you, because I got some really good sermons you could hurt. But uh joking um anyway, Um so so, but Jesus again, Uh, and when we do this and we reworked thing, I am reworking the parable study on the fellowship groups, I'm reworking them, but I'm using old material and doing so. But oftentimes when we red a servant, we we tailored to our audience and we changed some applications and some things that are there. So Jesus, of course, as a good pastor, would have done that same thing to illustrate the same truth. But the truth and the application is the same, which is we can't fit the new into the old. In other words, the Lord is saying, what the Pharisees have done to...

...the religion? Now what what? What is the old religion? What they have done is something that can't be patched. We just can't make it better. It's a garment like job, says a job man. Waste away like a rotten thing, like a garment that is moth in. And then the second parable concerns wine and wine skins, and here the parables are much closer in Matthew, Mark and Luke and again and telling the parable. The point here is that if they used old wine skins, and they had already been they had already been used um to uh to the wine to fill in them. And so then as the wine expanded uh in the new When they were new, they would have expanded with the wine. But now if you take those same wine skins and reuse them, they won't shrink this time. So if you fill it with wine and the wine expands, it's going to break the wine skins, and you're going to uh lose the new wine as well. And so that that is the point that we have here. And then in verse thirty nine, look gives as saying that's not found in Matthew or Mark. So this is interesting as well. And the point can be missed. Jesus said, and no one after drinking old wine desires new, for he says the old is good. Now. I don't know about you, but when I read that, my mind goes to the fact that says, well, of course the old wine is better. Old wine is always better, right you know you don't you don't go to the story by wine and and it's a hundred dollars because it was just you know, vented this year or something like that. But but you might do that for a very old wine and do that much. So it could say, well, of course the the old wine must be better because it's been aged more. But the point he's trying to make is maybe you should have your mind open. Maybe the new is better, and you don't know unless you try. And so the overall point that our Lord is making here is I am bringing something completely new. And of course you're thinking is that the old is always going to be better. But I want you to consider that possibly in this case, the new wine is better. And what I am bringing to you by both my words and my actions is proving to you that the New is better the BT I've troubled with his name always, but on your b away says, we cannot have the Gospel, which just a little touch of law and legalism we cannot have. We cannot have the law with just a few ounces of Jesus poured in. Now, I want to say, Jesus isn't trying to overthrow the Old Testament. He's not saying, yeah, just get rid of that, there's nothing there. No, he comes to fulfill all that. And he said not one jot or tittle would ever pass from the from that Old Testament. So he's not doing that. But what he's trying to do is change with the Pharisees. And the saddest season this ribes had made out...

...of the Old Testament. They had missed so many points. They were not doing it right until Jesus is trying to tell them, uh, it's different right now. And so we have to realize that they had made it into a legalism thing. And so Jesus has said, is it possible that what I'm bringing to you is actually better? Well, I want to make some applications this morning. The first one is we come to application. I wanted to deal with the question of fasting among Christians. This is a question that I find different opinions by different very respected UH Gospel teachers that I see. The problem in this text concerns what Jesus is referring to when he says the days will come when the bridegroom will be taken away and then they will fast. So exactly what days is that that he's talking about. There are some who would say that the days he's speaking of and the only days proper to fast are those days between his crucifixion and his resurrection. G. Campbell Morgan says, the days did come, and they did fast. That was local and transitory. This has no application to us. Why, because he is with us, he has not taken away. When he came back by the spirit to abide with them, the need for fasting past. So, in other words, his view is fasting is not for today. And we might look at the passage that Jesus refers to a John sixteen and says this the period he's talking about in versus nineteen and twenty, he entered he uh it intimates that the time is not going to be long. He said Jesus knew they wanted to ask him, so he said to them, is this what you are asking yourselves? What I mean by saying a little while and you will not see me? And again a little while and you will see me. Truly, I say to you, you will weep and lament, but the world will rejoice. You will be sorrowful, but you're sorrow will be turned into joy. And so is that what Jesus is saying. It's just that period of time when Christ is taken from them by crucifixion, and tell the resurrection that they would fast. Others have a different view. Charles Spurgeon says, and what is fasting for? That seems the difficult point. It is evidently practiced oftentimes by our Lord, and advised by him to his disciples. Not a kind of religious observance in itself meritorious, but a habit, when associated with the exercise of prayer, unquestionably helpful. I am not sure whether we have not lost a very great blessing in the Christian Church by giving up fastening. Another name you may have heard before, John Calvin says, according to the need of the times, pastors should exhort the people either to fasting, or to solemn supplications, or to other acts of humility, repentance...

...of faith and faith. So both of these two giants of the faith are saying that they believed that fasting is still helpful for the Christian Church. So should Christians practice fasting or should they not? For myself, I do believe that the scriptures indicate and mask that fasting is something that the church should um should practice. Uh. There are several different scriptures, including our text that is there, and of course that dependspend how you take our text. But an ext thirteen to concerning the church auld Antiacht. When they were getting ready to ordain people to ministry, it says, while they were worshiping the Lord and fasting. This is well after the resurrection of Christ, while they were worshiping the Lord and fasting. Later on and Act fourteen twenty three, and when they had appointed elders for them in every church, with prayer and fasting, they committed them to the Lord in whom they had believed. Paul says of them s off in Second Corinthian six five in stripes, in imprisonments, in tumults and labors, and watchings, in fastings. Some might say that those were forced fast and where Paul had no way to get food, and that's possible, I think, But I also think that Paul fasted other times as well. Then we have a couple of scriptures where, if you have a King James version, fasting is mentioned, but if you don't, it probably not mentioned. First countin seven five some manuscripts, that says, where Paul is speaking of married couples in their conjugal conjugal relations defrauging not one the other, except that you would consent for a time that you may give yourselves to fasting and prayer. But the later versions don't have fasting there. Matthew sev concerning the disciple's question as to why they were not able to cast out a demon, Jesus said, howbeit this kind goes not out but by prayer and fasting. The later versions do not have fasting in that passage. But I think to me the rightist argument for fasting is jesus own words in the Sermon on the Mount, he said to them, and when you fast, so, in other words, if it's not the time now, which Jesus said in our Texas Morning, to fast, there is coming a time when it would be proper to fast. He said, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigured their faces. That they're fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that you're fasting may not be seen by others, but by your father who is in secret. And your father, who sees in secret, will will reward you there as I said, Jesus says, when you fast. Now, I can tell you in my own personal life that for many years, fasting was a regular part of my Christian life, and and I tried to do several lengths to fast and in my life, and I would say it was very beneficial. But in the last several years, and I'd say many several...

...years, I have not fasted at all. I have used my health as an excuse that the doctors would say that being diabetic, it's not a good idea for me to fast, I shouldn't do it. Um And I could say, that's a really convenient excuse for me, so it works out really nice. But either way, I do think it is proper and good for Christians. Too fast. But I have to give you some caveats in saying that. First, the New Testament sets no time where we are commanded too fast. There are two scriptures I read to you that seemed to indicate that they did fast when they ordained leaders. But there's no command to us anywhere in the New Testament as to when we should fast. However, I think it's certainly okay for churches to ask for a voluntary fast from their members for a time, and I've done that in years past. Many years ago, back in the nineteen eighties, we had a time when three major families in our church decided to leave the church, and they all they all left. They felt that they needed to be part of a home church, and so they left our church. I met with them, I tried to persuade them. I could not persuade them, and so they left the church. So I called for the church to come together for a night of prayer. And as we prayed together, I told the church, I think it would be proper for us to fast uh starting tomorrow, however long you would want to fast. I didn't put any length on it for anybody, or any stipulations on it. I just said, I think it would be good for you to fast, and we can do this as a church, and asking God that they would restore these families to us. Now, one dear lady the next morning, so that was Thursday. The next morning I called people to start fast on Thursday. She called me ten thirty Thursday morning, said past her. I fasted. I fasted breakfast. So now I'm meeting my lunch right now. It's that I wasn't real long and fast. I guess to go to ten thirty in the morning. But nonetheless, but many of the church did fast for for an extended period of time. And and it's one of those times, you know, you call me a heretic, kick me out, And I'm not saying this is proper right for anybody. But I just knew in my heart at the end of that time that those families would return to us. I had no doubt, there was no question in my mind, and I knew and they did. Indeed they did. Indeed, all three of them returned to the church. Now, I'm not trying to put any kind of merit on fasting. I'm not trying to say, well, if you really need this answered, you should fast. You should. I'm not trying to say that, I'm just saying sometimes it's proper. Sometimes it is a way of approaching God. Uh that that indeed is proper to do. And um, I just I want to be careful. I would. And again, don't don't look at fasting. Secondly, don't look at because you faster, your holier than other people. That was a Pharisees argument. Is not that we don't become holy because we fast. It's not that...

...that at all. Calvin says, if anything pleases us, we forthwith desire to make it a law that others may live according to our pleasure. Then he says, let us first learn not to place holiness in outward and in different matters, and at the same time to restrain ourselves by moderation and equity. That we may not desire to restrict others to what we approve, but allow everyone to their own freedom. And so again, it doesn't make us holier. And thirdly, we shouldn't believe in any way that fasting has anything whatsoever to do with our salvation. We're always tempted to make our salvation a matter of works, even those of us who exult free grace and talk about God's salvation and God's electing us, and God call calling us uh. All of those things that we use, we're still tempted to go back into works righteousness. Colossian said, if with Christ you died to the elemental spirits of the world, why if you were still alive in the world, do you submit to regulations do not handle, do not taste, do not touch, referring to things that all perish as they're used according to human precepts and teachings. These have indeed an appearance of wisdom in promoting self made religion and asceticism and severity to the body, but they are of no value in stopping the indulgence of the flesh. So there again would be want to be very very careful, because whenever we get our hands on religion, we want to make it into some kind of works based thing. Years ago ago, I think this relates. I thought of this, and then I thought, maybe it doesn't. But I like this saying so much, I'm gonna say it anyway. Um. Someone said, the Romans made out of Christianity a good religion, the Germans made out of Christianity a good theology, and the Americans made out of Christianity a good business. I think that's true. And again I'm trying to relate it and make I don't know if I can't, but anyway, again, we want to fashion our religion according to us and according to our own works. And and the fourth thing, I'd say, I believe it's possible to relate fasting to other things besides just food. Calvin again says in addition, there's another sort of fasting, temporary and character, when we withdraw something from the normal regiment of living, either for one day or a definite time, and pledge ourselves to a tighter and more reached severe restraint in diet than ordinarily. So we might choose to give up the television for a period of time, we might choose not to look at our phone for a period of time, or other things that we that we might do with some recreational activity that we enjoy, we might we might want to do that. And so, looking at what Jesus said about it in our text this morning, the question is is this a day of feasting then, or is this a day of fasting? And I would say, yeah, it is.

It's a day of feasting, and it's a day fasting. Sometimes we feast. Sometimes we've asked. Now, I want to say also two more things about new, and then I'll close here. I don't think we should have Jesus saying here that what he's trying to teach us whatever is new is better, because that isn't always true. In fact, it probably is rarely true. There are people today that look at anything new in the church, and there's a lot of new stuff in the church today. Anything new is good because it's new wine. And people that don't think it's good, well, you know, you're just funny duddies and you don't understand the newness, and you you're you're you know, you don't know how to receive new wine into all of that. And so there's people that do that. Now, there's also people who think that anything that is new is bad, and they are equally wrong in that as well. We can't go that way either. There are many different things in the church that are new. Some are good, some are bad, and we need to be discerning and figure out what those things are. We have to walk a line. We don't want to remove the old landmarks, as a scripture tells us, but we don't want to also just give up on things because somebody else does them and we don't like it. Well, there's a lot to be said there, but I don't have enough time, so I'll just say with Thomas Brooks, the great Puritan writer, often would say, you are wise and know how to apply it, so I will leave it for you. But let me make a final application about the newness. Why with people by the millions reject the Gospel of Christ, why would they reject the offer of what is really really good for them? Why would they do that simply because in their mind the old is better. You see, sometimes all we know is the old. That's all we have to go by, and we might decide we kind of like the old. They live in sin. They think this is good. I'm enjoying it. I'm enjoying myself, and so I don't want to hear what you have to say there. Why would I give up what I have now and live a life that would be lived to the glory of God, When when I can live my life for me, this is a good life. Why would you change your life to where you gotta be in church one day a week, or or give ten percent of your income to the church. Or or any of those other things. Why why would you do that? I mean, who would want to do that? That doesn't make any sense at all. Why would you give up your life now to a life that asks you to serve and to sacrifice? Why would anybody do that? And all the saints of God say, because it's glorious, because it's the only fulfillment we have that we've come to. We finally found our life to find complete fulfillment. It finally changes us in such a way. We can't understand why...

...everybody doesn't sip of this new wine. Why doesn't everybody think of it? This is the greatest thing ever, This is the most wonderful life in the world. This is so great. Yes, tribulations, yes, everybody has them, But oh the glory of following God and following Christ and living for him. It's so glorious. But some can't understand it, and they say the old is better. But my challenge to you is, if you've never tried the new, if you've never turned to Christ and his death on the cross as the fulfillment of your salvation, I would say you'll find in it a glorious thing that will change your life. Forever and you'll never want to go away. And so the new when it comes to the Gospel, when it comes to Christ, the new is better. Let's pray love me thank you for your word and many practical lessons as well as spiritual since we can apply to our lives. Help us, Lord, is your people, that we would know the balance between doing what is new and old and understand that balance. Help us, Lord to be willing to proclaim to those around us the new wine and what it means. And Lord, help us to be like Levi in our text last week invited all their friends to come and see the Lord. Lord, help us to point others to Christ as well, and in our own lives. Lord, just make us evangelist and help us Lord to follow you in the way that you've called us to. And we pray God that it would use us in this way to bring others into the Kingdom of God as well. We thank you Lord for the cross. We thank you Lord that you have made a way that does not require us to work to earn our salvation, but simply ask us to trust in You and believe in your death, and then we will find new life. We thank you for this, Lord, in Jesus name Amen might,.

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