Covenant Words
Covenant Words

Episode 636 · 3 months ago

The Gospel of Luke #25

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Luke 6:12-16

Well, let us go to the Lord in prayers. We're going to come to his word here in a moment, and we need to ask God's illumination on this word to let us pray. And now our God and Father again, we do approach you in the name of our one and only blessed Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us and died for us, that we who were sinners, lost without hope in the world, might be called and chosen by you, even as those will read about in the text this morning, Lord, we thank you that you have called us out of darkness into your marvelous light, that you have translated us out of the kingdom of darkness and into the kingdom of your dear son. We're all is light, and so Lord we ask for light. Lord, we ask that your word would be a light to our path. We ask, oh God, that you would just illuminate it to us as we look at a text that is probably very familiar year to us. But Lord, I pray that you would enlighten new truths out of it, that you would speak to us and Lord encourage us in the area of prayer. And Lord, I asked that your blessing would be upon it. As I read it this morning to your people. I prayed in Christ name. Amen. And Luke chapter six, we've moved on and beginning in verse twelve, have a fairly short text this morning that I will be reading to you, beginning with verse twelve and going through verse sixteen. So I remind you again this is God's word. In these days. He went out to the mountain to pray, and all night he continued in prayer to God. And when day came, he called his disciples and chose from them twelve whom he named Apostles, Simon whom he named Peter, and Andrew his brother, and James and John and phil Betholomew and Matthew and Thomas, and James his son of Alpheus, and Simon who was called the Zellot, and Judas, the son of James. And Judas is Scariot who became a trader. Amen, that's why, and the reading of God's word, and you may be seated. So we moved to uh. Verse twelve. Luke chapter six is we're making their way towards um the I guess I'm not going to get to the end of Luke's I won't even pretend that we only have a couple of weeks left. But nonetheless, I found in my studies this week for this passage of scripture that many of the writers, uh, actually there's quite a bit of material they give on these verses because they kind of use it as a springboard to speak about the different disciples and the characteristics of the disciples and all of those things. So, um, I found they did that. But I don't want to do that, because, like I said, if I did that, I wouldn't even get through that, and so I would leave not even having finished this text. So I decided not to do that. But I do want to make a few notes about this list as we go through it, and I want to talk about a few things about the disciples that I think are interesting. But there's much more that could be said about all these disciples, but I'm not going to be doing that this morning. So here in verse twelve, as we begin the text today, we see again what we've seen all along here, which is the indefiniteness of Luke. Luke doesn't give us definite things. He just kind of uh speaks and kind of generality. So he says, in those days well, what days are you talking about, Luke, Well, we don't know what days he's talking about. He goes up into a mountain. Well what mountain, Luke? Well, Luke doesn't want to tell us what mountain he goes into. He uses the definite article, although in this passage he says that he went up into the mountain, which would...

...indicate to us it was probably a very well known mountain. But which one of those, we really don't know, because Jerusalem, like Tucson, had a few mountains around it, so we're not sure. And again Luke is not interested in telling us the story of Jesus in a chronological fashion. Now it is mostly chronological, but it doesn't follow an exact chronological order. As we go through this, he has other things in mind and how he is telling the story of Christ. And through this um we have learned in the passages before this that the enemies of Jesus are increasing. We saw that in the last two stories at the enemies of Christ are increasing. Not only are they increasing, but they are intensifying in what they want to do to Jesus. And so there is much that is happening here. Mark particularly tells us in this account that at this point they were seeking how to put Christ to death, already trying to do that at this point. Now Matthew, Mark, and Luke all record to us the calling of the twelve Apostles, but it is only Luke who tells us that before Jesus did this momentous thing, that he spent the night in prayer. One of the things that Luke is much more interested in talking about than the other gospel writers is the prayer life of Jesus. Not all the gospel writers, of course mentioned prayers of Jesus, and John in particular gives to us the longest prayer we have of Jesus. But Luke particularly likes prayer. And when Luke speaks about prayer concerning Jesus, he almost always uses the verbal form of the word for pray, so he doesn't he doesn't use the prayer words so much. And in fact, the noun prayer only occurs three times in the Gospel of Luke, but the verse row forms of pray, pray praying prayed occur twenty times in the Gospel of Luke. It seems whenever Jesus goes apart to pray, that something spectacular or out of the ordinary happens after this takes place here, we're going to see the calling of the twelve Apostles. Later on in Luke nine, when Jesus again goes up to amount of the prey. We are going to see that ended with the great account of the transfiguration of Jesus before the Apostles, which is a pretty momentous event in the ministry of Christ, as both John and Peter mentioned it in their writings, is something that had a great effect upon their life. They both mention it. And of course, who can forget Jesus going to pray that last night in the garden of Caossemite, where he beseeched his disciples to join him in prayer. But of course they slept through that. And the phrase here that Luke uses of Jesus praying, and the Greek not all of the versions translated exactly. Uh. They probably think it they want to do it in a way that is more understandable in English, but the literal standard version actually translates it this way. He was passing the night in the prayer of God, that is literally what it is in the Greek. In the prayer of God. He was passing Uh the night there. In other words, he was praying a prayer that is in conformity to the will of his Father. It seems like in this prayer, and I'll talk about this through the message this morning, that Christ is being received from the Father. He's receiving from the Father the men that he should choose out of these large group of disciples that is following him. That there are twelve in particular, that he is to choose and to call them as apostles. And so in the morning after prayer he will call the great group of...

...disciples to him, and out of those he will designate twelve to be apostles. And so later on in Jesus's high priestly prayer in John chapter seventeen, it says this. In verse six, he speaks of these men. He says, I have manifested your name to the people whom you gave me out of the world yours they were, and you gave them to me, and they have kept your words. So it seems like Jesus is referring to the fact that the Father gave those names to him that night in prayer. Now again, I know there's mysteries here with the UH dual nature of Christ and all of that, and I'll address that a little later. On g Campbell, Morgan writes of Christ spending the night in prayer before choosing these men. He said, I would like to read that in churches where they're going to elect deacons and officers at the church, spends the night in prayer before that. But if the law needed guidance, if our Lord Jesus Christ needed guidance, if he needed to know who that should be chosen, I think we probably need that as well. I think if he needed it, we can say that we need it also. And so we're told that out of the disciples, he chooses a certain number. And I'm not gonna ask you because you know what you're yelling out seven this time, because the number is actually twelve. I know you know that, really, But uh so we have the twelve apostles, which is also very important number in scripture because we read of the twelve tribes of Israel, and there are other twelves that are in the Bible as well, and so it appears that our Lord is gathering together a new Israel is going to follow him, and so we, uh we see this number very important in Revelation twenty one, beginning with verse twelve. It had a great high wall speaking of the new Jerusalem, with twelve gates, and at the gates were twelve angels, and on the gates and name of the twelve tribes of the Sons of Israel were inscribed on the east three gates, on the north three gates, on the south three gates, and on the west three gates. And UH always found it interesting that one of the gates of the of Jerusalem, the UH, the real city now is the water gate. I thought that was an interesting thing. But nonetheless it says on the wall of the city had twelve foundations, and on them were the twelve names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb. Now that's going to be important as they go. And I want to talk about something else, because well, in fact, i'll talk about it now. Uh. The The idea is, remember in Acts one, after Judas has betrayed the Lord, and the Lord has been with the disciples, and he's ascended into heaven, and he has apparently given them some information as to what they should do when they are gathered together. In Acts one, it says they gathered together for the purpose of choose someone who would take the place of Judas. Now, why would you need to do that? You know, Okay, we were twelve or eleven. We're assuming very shortly they're going to be eleven again because James is going to be martyred, and so we wonder, why do you why did they need to do that? But they felt that they needed to in indeed, put the number to twelve, and so this happens in Act one. Peter says, it's necessary therefore, of the men who went with us during the time in which the Lord Jesus went in and went out among us, beginning from the immersion of John. That's an interesting translation, but nonetheless to the day in which he was received up from us, one of these to become with us a witness of his resurrection. And so, in other words, we need a twelve. We need to fill this number again that our Lord called to be twelve. Now, I'm not going to get into the argument. I'm sure you're all familiar with the argument. Were the disciples right in doing this? Should they have cast lots? Is that what they should have done? Shouldn't they have waited? Because God had his own apostle the apostle Paul, and he is going to be the twelve when...

...his name will be inscribed on the on the gates and not Matthias. Well, I'm not I'm not going to get into that. That's that for another day. But again Jesus will take these men who are called disciples. And the word for the cipo in the Greek it's matth taste, and it basically means a learner or a follower. The word has found over two hundred and fifty times in the New Testament, and it comes from a verb that means to learn. We actually get our words mind and mental and those words like that are actually from that Greek word. So then our Lord, out of this group of learners, of people that have learned of Christ, he now chooses twelve apostles. Verse thirteen says that Jesus gave the name of apostles to the twelve men that he had chosen. And the word apostle in Greek basically means a cent one, or we could say someone who has been delegated to go out from somebody else and they are given particular orders that they are to do. That's what an apostle is. It's kind of like an ambassador in that. And so in the Gospel of Luke, we have had the Angel Gabriel was sent by the Lord to come down and speak to Mary. We had John the Baptist, who is called one that was sent to proclaim uh the word of the Lord and the wilderness. And now the apostles are sent. James Edwards notes that he thinks the word apostle like the word agape in Greek, which means love. That these words were particularly appropriated by the early Church and given a sense that they didn't have an everyday language at that day. So these are all followers of Jesus, learners of Jesus. But now the Lord's going to choose twelve whom he is particularly going to send. Everybody can be learner of Jesus, but there are these men who are going to be given a special authority. They will be able to do great and mighty works, and they will also be the ones who will write the scriptures that you and I call, and rightly so the word of God. And so they are that. So these men are particular delegates. Now you might also know there's a controversy concerning apostles in the New Testament. There are those that would um divide apostles into two groups, and they would call the one group the capital a apostles and the other group the small a Apostles. In the Capital a apostles, we would have, of course the eleven disciples that were there in Acts one Uh and maybe Matthias as well, and then we would also have Paul included in the Capital a apostles. In the small a apostles we would have people like Barnabas, Silas, Timothy, Epathrods, different people like this it are identified as apostles, but did not seem to have the same power that the others did. Um, I won't again make a decision on that one way or another for you. But Jesus calls to disciples. Out of them, he he he chooses twelve. So first he calls and then he chooses, just like he does with us in salvation. Were first called by God in the journey past, and then we are chosen in Him again. And these words called and chosen in the verbal form are only used by Luke Uh in talking about these now. Even though Jesus calls them apostles, he never actually refers to them as apostles. The rest of the time he usually says something like he called the twelve to them or the disciples that are usually referred to that way, but we see here they are designated as apostles. Well, let's look at Versus fourteen through sixteen. In these verses, we have one of the four listings of the hostles that we have in...

...the Bible. We have a listing in Mark ten except Matthew ten, excuse me. We have a listing in Mark three, and we also have a listing in Acts one, which, by the way, Acts is also written by Luke. And then we have the listing here uh in uh Luke six as well. Now, I told you a lot of the writers like to get sketches, and they might write two chapters of writing just on Peter alone at this point. But I'm not going to do that. But I do want to mention some things that I think are important. It's important that when you compare the four listings in the three Gospels and the Book of Acts, because John doesn't give us a listing, it's important to see that there are some things that are the same in every list, and there are some things that are different. For example, one thing that is different are the names. They're not the same exact names, uh in each of those listings. And I will deal with that in a moment. The first thing I will tell you about these lists it is the same and that every single one of the four list there is one disciple who is always listed first, and of course that is Peter. He is the one that is listed first in those in all of those lists, um and in the Gospels list when when we're giving him. In Luke and the other ones he has basically called Simon, who is called Peter because of course Jesus gave him the new name of Peter. And then in Luke and Matthew, the second disciple that is listed is Andrew, and it's mentioned in both those accounts that Andrew is the brother of Peter. In Mark An Acts, however, Andrew is not listed second. In Mark, the second apostle listed as James, and in Acts it is John. In Mark and Matthew, James and John are listed as brothers, but not in Luke An Acts, and Mark also adds to us that Jesus gave the name Sons of Thunder to James and John. However, in every list that we have. The first four disciples that are given in every list are Peter, Andrew, James, and John. Now not in that exact order, but they're always the first four that are given in every list. Then the next four disciples are also always the same, although not in the same order. They are always the next four that are given in every list. They are Philip, Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew. And in every single list, like the first one, the order is different, with Peters always first. In this one the order is different, but Philip is always the first one listed in this group. And so of course, if you do your math right now, uh, that means that the last four disciples are also always going to be the same. But again, uh, they are not going to be in the same order. But in every list of the last four, the first one of the four will be James, the son of Elpheus, and then the others. And in case you haven't already guessed it, the fourth apostle in that list always is Judas Scariot. He's always the one that is listed last. The man that's called Judas the son of James in Luke and Acts is called Daddy Us in the other accounts, and Although John doesn't have a list in the in his Gospel of the Twelve Apostles, he does refer to a couple of the apostles by different name. The Bartholomew in our list is not mentioned by John, but John instead mentions a man by the name of Nathaniel, the man that was out Uh that said, can anything good come out of Nazareth? The man that Jesus said of such a man, there was no guile in him, and so he asked, as I said, can anything good come out of Nazareth? And the answer, in case you're wondering, is yes, indeed something good can...

...come out of Nazareth. And then Judas the son of James or Thaddius in UH and John is referred to as Judas Uh, not scary it. Judas not a scary it. That's in John fourteen. So Judas the son of James is called Judas a son of James, Thaddius and Judas not scary it in those lists. Now it's interesting to note again that we are told Simon is called Peter UH. And we're told in the Gospels that our Lord renamed Simon as Peter. And everyone knows John three sixteen but Mark three sixteen says he appointed the twelve Simon, to whom he gave the name Peter. Later on, he'll say in Matthew sixteen eighteen, I tell you you are Peter, and on this rock I'll build my church, and the gates of house will not prevail against it. And every single time from now on that Luke refers to this disciple, he will, all ways, with one notable exception, he will always refer to him as Peter. But there's one time when he is not referred to as Peter. In fact, he's referred to a Simon, not once, but his name is doubled. And that happens in Luke one, where Jesus said, Simon, Simon behold Satan demanded to have you that he might sift you like wheat. And I think it's because in that moment Jesus is telling the time he's named Peter the Rock. But now he's thinking, Peter is coming to time when you're not going to be a rock, and you're gonna fail, and you're gonna deny me, And so he calls him in that instant Simon. But every other time he is referred to as Peter. James and John. It's interesting to note I'd actually never thought of this, and and uh, I kind of feel foolish that I had never thought about it, and maybe you did. But we read and Acts twelve two that the very first I mentioned this earlier, the very first apostle that was martyred was James. And I've always known that, but it never struck me. But as I was reading, it made me think about these things that apparently, because we're told uh an extraal off two he killed James, the brother of John, with the sword. This seems to indicate that James must have had quite a bit of influence, either among the twelve or among the people around them, the people they were testifying to, or perhaps both. That Herod would choose James as the person, you'd think, well, why wouldn't you have chosen Peter, why wouldn't have sen one of the other sort of appears that perhaps James had quite a bit of influence at that time, and so he has martyred. He becomes the first disciple or apostle to follow Jesus into heaven, and his brother John is going to have to wait about seventy more years, and he's going to be the last apostle that follows Jesus into Heaven of the next or disciples. We know Matthew only by his calling from Jesus, which we looked at earlier, the calling of Levi, and also the fact that he wrote a gospel. That's all we know about Matthew. We know he was called, we know that account, and we know that he wrote a gospel. But we don't know anything else about Matthew. There's nothing else about him, even in his own gospel that we know of Thomas, we know primarily is doubting Thomas, even though I think that is extremely unfair to Thomas. I don't think if any of the disciples had not been present at that first a period of Christ, I don't think any of them would have believed it. So I think we're a little bit unfair to Thomas in that sense. So I don't like to just refer to him in a negative way like that, But it is Thomas. Interestingly enough, when Jesus speaks about going to Jerusalem and the disciples think he's talking about going to die, which he will originally, but he's basically talking about going to raise Lazarus. It's interesting in John eleven, it's tom Us who...

...says to them, to the disciples that Jesus is going. He said, let us go with him, that we may also die with him. That's a pretty major statement, right I think that kind of does the old doubting Thomas thing. I want to give him a little bit of cred right there. I think that that's pretty good. And it's Thomas who asked the Lord at the Last Supper, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way? Of these last four lesser known apostles, we actually have one who's mentioned eleven different verses in the Gospel of John, and mostly in a positive light. That is the apostle Philip. It's Philip who found the apostle Bartholomey which I mentioned our Nathaniel, and brought him to Jesus. It's Philip who brings the Greeks to Jesus when they said they wanted to see Jesus. He brings the Greeks to Andrew, and then Andrew and Philip in turn bring the Greeks to Jesus. That's Philip again. It's Philip who the Lord says, or he says to the Lord, uh two hundred penning worth is not enough to feed these people in the feeding of the five thousand, that they couldn't buy enough bread for that. And so Philip is um quite often mentioned as well. And Bartholomew, as I said, or Nathaniel is the disciple of whom there is no guile, the three least known of the disciples. Um Simon. We know he's a zealot, and that's basically it. Mazzella was somebody that believed it was illegal for Rome to be governing their country, and they were willing to engage in a revolution to cause that to stop. Of James the son of Alpheus, he's called James Celeste or James the Younger, and a couple other places, but we don't know anything else about him. The other Judas, we only have one thing written of him. It's in John four two, or John says Judas not a scary It said to him, Lord, how is it you will manifest yourself to us and not to the world. And then we have the disciple that, unfortunately, outside of Peter, has probably mentioned more than any other disciple, and that of course is Judas, called scariot, and is oftentimes referred to as the betrayer of the Lord, and uh scariot most people think is referring to the fact that he came from the city of Carryas, and so he was Judas from Caryas, or Judas is scariot. Others take the more literal meaning, which would be a scariot would translate into dagger man, so Judas would be the man that puts a dagger into Christ, not literally, but basically ends up in that way. There are contrasts between these men, but the only one I'm gonna mention because I found it the most interesting in thinking about it, that had our Lord not called these apostles, had they not been brought to him, it could have been very likely that Matthew would have been murdered by Simon no Zella. That could have that could have actually happened, since the Zealites were people that wanted to do that, and since Matthew was of the most hated class of people in that area. Who knows what would have happened. Of course, we don't know, but it's at least interesting to kind of think about that. So let me mention some things now an application as to close this morning, I mentioned the word called and chosen. I just want to reiterate again that's every believer is. In that case, we're not necessarily called to be apostles. In fact, we're not called to be apostles outside of the maybe the small a sense that we are set ones with the Gospel. But every believer is both called and chosen of God. But I really want this morning to apply in the main thing, as I mentioned earlier in the beginning of the service, that our Lord was certainly a man of prayer. As I said, he spent the whole night in prayer. The result the next day, he's able to spare end or to...

...choose exactly twelve men whom he knows are to be those men that would be with him for the rest of his life and ministry, and would be those that would be delegated to carry the Gospel of Christ to that then known world. Eleven of those twelve would become pillars of the Church. They would be the original evangelists who would spread the word of God. The other one would also serve the purpose of God, but in a completely different way, in facilitating the death of Christ upon Calvary, thus making salvation possible. After choosing the twelve. We didn't get that far in the text. Jesus will also minister to a multitude of people, and he'll preach the Gospel to them, and heal many of them. And then he will preach probably the most famous sermon and Matthew, known as the Sermon on the Mount in Luke, sometimes called the Sermon on the Plane or the Sermon on the Level, and that, but yet very very similar to of the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew. What a wonderful thing is prayer. The prayer has put our Lord to this place that he does all of these things following this night in prayer. If there was anybody that would be upon the earth that we would think could exist and do great things without praying, it would be the Lord Jesus. We would think he could do it. Charles Spurgeon said, if any man or woman born might have lived without prayer, it was surely the Lord Jesus Christ. And there are parts of prayer that we do, and we pray that the Lord Jesus wouldn't even needed to include in his prayer. We might need to spend a couple of hours, and we were going to spend the night in prayer, we might need to spend two hours just in confession, and sin well knocked that off. Our Lord didn't have to do that. There are a lot of things he doesn't have to pray about that we did spurgeon again, says yet Mark carefully, although our glorious Master did not rea wire to pray in some of these respects in which it is more needful for us. Yet, never was there a man who was more abundant in prayer and in supplication, nor one in whom prayer was exercised with so much vehemence and persistence. Kent Hughes rights. There too often we engaged not independent prayer, but in obligatory or routine prayer. Jesus didn't say, apart from me, you can do something. Jesus said, apart from me, you can do nothing. Have you ever spent a whole night in prayer? Now, please don't misunderstand me at this point. I'm not here to condemn. I'm not telling you you're condemned if you have under you're lesser Christian or anything like that. I'm just asking the question, and you don't have to answer out loud or raise your hand at all. But I'm just asking the question, because in challenging you to do so, I might be opening up one of the greatest nights of your life that you will ever have. In V. Two that was a few years ago now, But I, along with a number of young people, scattered together in a convent in my city of home, city of Rochester, Minnesota, for the purpose of spending an entire night in prayer. We basically went from seven to seven in prayer that night, and so for those hours we prayed and we prayed. I can tell you personally that for me it was probably the most life changing event in my Christian life. My wife was also present that night, and she can talk to you about it as well. But during that night I went from perhaps some of the deepest loaves in my life to the highest highs of my life that I had during that night. I may have referred to this earlier, but I prayed the prayer for the first time, and I prayed, Lord show...

...me my heart, and I didn't like what I saw. But the Lord showed me my heart, and I saw, among other things, the hatred I had in my heart from my own brother. Now I'm not telling you that whenever we pray we should be praying a long time, and that's always the way it should be, and there's no call for short prayers or anything like that. Spurgeon again staid, I do not think we are bound to pray long as the general rule. I am afraid, however, there is no great need to make that remark, for most of Christians are short enough, if not far too short in private worship. I thought that was good. I don't say you have to do it, but I don't think there's any need for me to make that remark anyway. Prayer is important. Why is it important to us? Well, it's important for us in one way, for the same reason it was important for our Lord, because we need to know the will of God for our lives. It's important to know God's will when you when you look at this group that Jesus chooses, it's probably not the group we would have chosen to be the Apostles. We probably would have picked other people whose names we don't even know anymore. But our Lord chose exactly. There isn't one religious leader in that group. There isn't one scribe, there isn't one Pharisee, there's none of those people. There's fishermen, there's tax collectors, there's all of these other people that are Lord chooses. There's no as far as we know, there's nobody that was rich in that group. We don't read of any of them that were at all. But yet they were, though they were those whom the Father willed our Lord to choose. If our Lord needed that night in prayer to discern the will of God, how much more do we need prayer to discern God's will in our life. I think prayer is also important because it's one of the greatest things we can do towards the salvation of the lost. Jesus said in Matthew that we should pray the Lord of the harvest would send forth labors into the field. Now, probably, like you, I don't remember every sermon I've ever heard, and I've heard a lot of sermons, and I don't remember every one of those sermons, but some sermons, like I'm sure with you as well, stick out in my mind that have always been with me. In one sermon, that's that way is one of earlier ones I heard. It wasn't the earliest, but it was when I was in Bible College and I was working in a church in Northfield, Minnesota, and my pastor preached a sermon that he entitled Neglected Prayers, and I love that sermon. He talked about prayers we are commanded to pray in the Bible that we often don't pray. And one that I remember particularly that he used was Jesus UH telling us to pray the Lord of the harvest that he would send labors into the vineyard. Now, I don't know how often you pray that prayer. Maybe you're very regular in that prayer. Could be I don't know. I know I'm not as regular as I should be in praying that prayer. But it's important for us to pray that for the in gathering of the lost. And so we see that what God does in prayer towards that. When the disciples gathered together on the day of Pentecost for prayer, and they are already an extended prayer, we read in next chapter one it says the next one fourteen, all these with one accord were devoting themselves to prayer, and the first thing they needed prayer for was who were they going to choose to replace Judas as the apostle. Just as Our Lord spent the night in prayer to determine who those twelve men would be. And but yet immediately after these prayers that we read about an next one, the Holy Spirit comes down upon them on the day of Pentecost, and Peter gets up, like Jesus got up after Luke, and pray and preach the famous sermon, the Sermon on the Plane. Peter gets up and preaches his perhaps most famous erman on the day of...

Pentecost, and we are told as a result of that sermon that three thousand people were brought into the kingdom at that time. And so we see how important prayer is. In Jesus praying, we see one of the great mysteries of the incarnation and the two natures of the Lord. We'd say, well, as a second person of the God had, of course he would want to commune with the Father and the Spirit and have the triune counsel. Of course they would. But what about his man? He also needed to pray as man. And again it's hard for us to totally unwrap the mystery of the two natures of Christ, but nonetheless identifying with us, he needed to pray and pray he did, and pray intently for us, and how many times we see Jesus praying, and sometimes he's praying extremely intently. We read in Hebrews Chapter five it says in verse seven, in the days of his flesh, Jesus offered up prayers and supplication, with loud crying and tears to him who was able to save him from death. And he was heard because of his reverence incausemite we are totally prayed, so intently that he sweat as it were drops a blood. Hartley Coleridge wrote in one of his sonnets about Christ, why craven prayer? What was his own? By might vain? Is the question? Christ was man, indeed, and being man, his duty was to pray. Kent Hughes says, though Jesus was the eternal son of God, though he created everything, though he is the elfin Omega, though everything is moving toward and will culminate in him, he could not live his human life apart from dependent prayer. I mentioned earlier that these disciples were basically ordinary men, and that should give all of us hope. I don't know how many of you are extraordinary here this morning, and how many of us are ordinary, but we could look at ourselves and say, well, I'm certainly not going to be a Peter or a John. No way I'm going to achieve to that. I'm not going to be the apostle Paul at all. You might remember Abraham Lincoln said that God must have loved ordinary people because he made so many of them. Oswald Chambers wrote, God can achieve his purpose either through the absence of human power and resources or abandonment of reliance on them. All through history, God has chosen and used nobody's because their unusual dependence on Him made possible the unique display of his power and grace. He chose and used somebody's only when they renounced their dependence on their natural abilities and resources. We have this treasure, Paul said to the Corinthians and Jars of Clay. He said in Second Corinthians twelve that God said to him, my grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness. He said, therefore, I will boast all the more gladly and my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me. For the sake of Christ. I'm content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities, for when I'm weak, I'm strong. Paul asked in First Corinthians, one, where is the wise? One? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world. It is the ordinary people of this world, touched by God, called chosen, and have learned the secret of private prayer that God uses you. See, it's not your giftings. It's the ability for you to rely upon the Lord, to pray to the Lord, to spend time with him that causes God to use us. And so don't look down...

...on yourself, don't think it's hopeless, because you can pray as well as any other believer in this church, and God can use you in ways that a way beyond our understanding. Let's pray, Father me thank you for your word. We thank you for the fat God that you've called us as a people chosen us. And part of what you've called us to is for a life of prayer. Lord, I would say I fall so far short, so far short. But Lord, just I would pray you ignite in all of us a desire for prayer in our own lives. Perhaps are those here whose prayer life is exemplary that the rest of us should imitate and follow. But for those of us who feel a lack help us, Lord, because we who are people that have been brought to the cross, we who realize there was no works we could ever do to save us we have all people should understand that we are lost without you, that in order to do what you would have us to do, we must go to you in prayer, even as you did that night on the mountain. So help us, Lord. If there are those who have never called upon you, who do not know your name, who have never trusted in the blood and the death of Christ for their salvation, Lord, I pray that they may do so this morning and now find the power that they may have in prayer and changing their life and the life of others. We thank you God, make us above all the people. Let's seek your face. So when you say to us, seek my face, we will respond Thy face, Oh Lord, I will seek. I pray God you would add your blessing to this heard in Christ's name. Amen. Amen,.

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